Take the 2-minute tour ×
Graphic Design Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for Graphic Design professionals, students, and enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This site seemed like the best match for my question.

So I'm about to graduate college, and I made a nice resume in Word. I used a kind of fancy tabling system that took me forever (I had no idea what I was doing), and threw in a small touch of color on the headings, converted to a pdf, and promptly lost the original document when my computer crashed. I'm trying to avoid remaking it entirely.

So I have this pdf, and it was perfect except that it said I was looking for an internship, which was inaccurate. So I photoshoped it to say a full-time job, and now it looks perfect.

So I go to upload it to my school's recruiting server, and it says Max FileSize Exceeded. I check the pdf's filesize: 35mb. You should have seen my jaw drop.

I really don't ever use photoshop, or do any sort of editing work. Not my area of expertise.

Can anyone explain why it's so huge, and is there a way to get it back under 500kb? The pdf has no graphics...except a smattering of very softly shaded table cells.

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

I'm probably way late to this, but it's always an easy way out to use the AdobePDF printer, and simply export out a dumb (yet tiny file size) PDF. Last resort, and hang on to the original, but it'll work in a pinch.

share|improve this answer

I don't know if you tried this yet but if you uncheck the "PERSERVE PHOTOSHOP EDITING CAPABILITES" and the "OPTIMIZE FOR FAST WEB PREVIEW" options on the 'General' window of the save box it reduces a file from 25mb to about 10mb. If you go into the 'Compression' window of the same save box and choose a Medium jpeg compression it will bring it down to about 3.5mb. I save my files for print this way and unflattened with a 5mm bleed and the layer is locked. Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

I've also found that flattening the image and then converting it to a smart object helps a lot. I use "smallest file size" setting, with "editable layers" unchecked, and compression at high or max keeps the quality pretty decent at 300kb file sizes. That being said, a program like Pages creates beautiful PDFs at even smaller sizes, so it's clear that Photoshop is not the right tool for this job, I just use it to slap my signature on some things.

share|improve this answer

The more the image DPI, the larger will its size be. If you plan to print that pdf then its advisable to retain it, else if you have designed for web purposes only, I would suggest you to compress your pdf using this excellent online service: www.smallpdf.com

share|improve this answer

The primary reason for this is that when you save a Photoshop Document as PDF, it saves all the features contained in the photoshop document (e.g. layers, color profiles etc.) including the ones that would aid it to be later edited in photoshop if need be.

Something I would suggest as a solution to your problem (that I use the most frequently for PDF optimization) is using Nitro PDF. Simply open your PDF in Nitro PDF editor and select Prepare>Optimize Document from the file menu. Now customize your document according to your needs of size and quality and save it.

It has always provided me with good results. Hoping the same for you. Cheers.

share|improve this answer

Try knocking out the background so the white-space is transparent. You're basically asking Photoshop to export a huge image to PDF, so less bitmapped image data and more alpha transparency should decease the file size.

Also, as other have probably mentioned:

• Image -> Mode -> Greyscale

• Uncheck the Layers box in your Save As dialogue.

share|improve this answer
1  
Obviously by converting it to greyscale the OP would lose the colored headings though. So I don't think that's a valid approach. –  Bart Arondson Dec 12 '13 at 13:34

In your situation, I would download and install the MS Office 2013 public preview and open the PDF in Word 2013, which in my tests does a fine job of converting a PDF into an editable Word doc -- particularly one that was created from Word in the first place. Word 2010 may be able to do the same, but I've not tested that.

share|improve this answer
    
I have complete faith that you're right, but in this case you may be underestimating just how %#)@%*'ed the tabling system I used really is. Not to mention the photoshop bit. –  Aerovistae Sep 26 '12 at 20:50

I second Scott's advice. Your PDF save settings will affect your output file. When saving from Photoshop, select Smallest File Size from your Adobe PDF Presets menu (in the Save As Photoshop PDF dialog). You may also want to check Optimize for Fast Web View. Check your compression settings as well. You can compress the image to a lower resolution. Lower resolution will affect your output file size.

share|improve this answer
1  
If the OP uses high compression, he/she ought to print it out and verify that the presentation is legible and acceptable. One might assume the electronic upload means it will not be printed out, but a low-resolution print out will probably ensure the resume is removed from serious consideration very early in the process. This is especially true for jobs which have an office-worker style component to them. –  horatio Sep 26 '12 at 20:53
    
Agreed. Checking resolution on a hard copy is best before uploading for review. It may be that resetting the type in InDesign is the better option for smaller file size and better output. –  tinym Oct 1 '12 at 17:02

By saving it from Photoshop you've saved an image file rather than merely text and shapes.

So, your PDF is now just one big image. Photoshop may not have been the best tool to edit the PDF with.

You can try flattening the Photoshop file before resaving it. That may reduce the file size.

Optimally you'd want to save a PDF from an application which contains live text.

share|improve this answer
    
I saved it as a pdf! ...a photoshop pdf...I was hoping they were secretly alter-egos of the same filetype... –  Aerovistae Sep 26 '12 at 19:25
2  
A PDF is merely a container. That container can hold a variety of different things - some lightweight, others very heavy. –  Scott Sep 26 '12 at 19:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.