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I have 3 images which are of the same size and color (gray) and PPI and I want to put them in a new image together vertically. so I simply cut and drag each image to the new Photoshop document. it seems that the first image has the same color as the original image after transfer but for the second image (that is right below the first image) the color is a little reduced (lighter gray compared to the first one) and for the third image, that is right below the second image, the gray color is even lighter than the second one. can anybody tell me what should I do about this?

thanks

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"Grey" is a pretty ambiguous term. 50% black is grey. 199R 199G 199B is grey. 10C 10M 10Y 10K is grey. –  Scott Oct 2 '12 at 6:24
    
Let's cover the obvious: is one document RGB and the other CYMK, or grayscale? –  Lauren Ipsum Apr 15 '13 at 16:47
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2 Answers

Make sure your blend modes and opacity on each layer is set to default. Assuming that is all okay, try adding an adjustment layer to the 2nd and 3rd images to adjust the color/tone/contrast so that the images are all consistent.

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It sounds like the documents have different colour profiles assigned to them. You can check by choosing Assign Color Profile from the Edit menu. That will show you the colour profile attached to the document.

Color Profile

Depending on where the images were sourced, you may wish to assign or convert. It really depends on the desired result. Assign will keep the color values the same, but change the appearance. Convert will keep the appearance the same, but change the color values.

It also depends where the final image is going and if you will be keeping the colour profile in the output file.

Colour management can be tricky business. If that is the problem, it's worth reading up a little more about it.

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