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How to design the 3D red cube in the 1st poster? (Love the design!)

http://www.coroflot.com/kevinburke/Posters

Of course, they have mentioned that they used Pixel Art, Maya etc, but is it possible just to create the 3d red cube and map background in photoshop?

Would really appreciate some tips! :)

sammydude

enter image description here

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Welcome to the site. You've kinda got two questions in one there, which makes it harder for anyone to give the clean crisp answers we like here. You're diluting your question(s). I'd focus on the cube: the map is either really easy, if you've got a map image you can put overlay layers over (research layer blend modes and photoshop lighting effects), or too big a task to talk you through here, if you're drawing a map from scratch... –  user568458 Oct 8 '12 at 16:42
    
Thanks for inserting the image here user568458! Yes. The map should be easy I guess. Won't be drawing from scratch. Will check out your suggestions on that. The cube with the grid is more important for me. Would be really helpful, if I can get tips on that. Thanks again! –  sammydude Oct 8 '12 at 16:44
    
Cool, I'll edit the question so it's clearer and more google-friendly –  user568458 Oct 8 '12 at 17:37
    
Thanks a lot, user568458! :) –  sammydude Oct 8 '12 at 18:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you have Photoshop extended (with 3D) you can do the following steps. I am not trying to make an exact replica here, just showing roughly the steps you can take to create something like this within Photoshop.

Open a new project, here I'm using 800x600 pixels

From the 3D menu, select:

Menu: 3D - New shape from layer - Cube

Then rotate your cube in the position you want (or camera which can be easier if you want to add other objects to the scene).

Now, select a surface on the cube. Lets start with what we see as top and replace it with a texture:

Texture to use

This texture is made in a separate file. I filtered with mosaic (12x12) and then filled it with a pattern to make those black lines.

After selecting it as texture we get this result:

Cube with texture front

We then do the next side, but for this side I am using a different texture based on the image above where I have cut a slice from the bottom without any top lines. This will make the image to be repeated so it appears as long lines:

Texture added to one side

For the other side you need to create a copy of this last texture and rotate it 90 degrees. The result will be like this:

Pre-render result

Now all you need to do is to adjust lighting (set spot-light), add a "floor" with the map and render in RayTrace mode. This will generate shadows and so forth for you.

Hope this helps!

(I accidentally "killed" the file as in I didn't save it - I intended to show a result with a mockup map etc., but I think you get the idea of the process).

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It is possible, what you need here is to have a vanishing point. Instead of having a 'horizon' vanishing point though, on this poster it's a (more or less) random point on the canvas.

The image below may help you visualize the idea of vanishing point use. Vanishing points

To make life easier, Photoshop has a tool that helps you with vanishing points (I believe it's also simply called 'vanishing point'). Along the lines that all go to the set vanishing point, you can draw lines which eventually (with the use of many layers, probably) get you a nice looking result like on this poster. My guess is that it'll take many hours though :)

For a proper result, I think decent spatial/geometrical visualization ability would be required.

All I can say is: Just try it, experiment!

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