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How would I select a specific Pantone color in Photoshop, e.g. PMS 5625?

Also, how do you pick a Pantone colour that is similar to a specific CMYK color, e.g. C61, M41, Y58, K16 green?

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In this case Pantone 5615C looks closest to the CMYK color.

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"In this case Pantone 5615C looks closest to the CMYK color..." - this is a false comparison, as you are not actually comparing Pantone or CMYK colour values, but an RGB conversion of each. Scott's method will give you the official closest match as defined by Pantone. –  e100 Nov 21 '12 at 10:27
    
By the way, this is probably better as two separate questions. –  e100 Nov 21 '12 at 10:28
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Select a specific Pantone color in Photoshop

Open the Color Picker
click the Color Libraries
Type the number of the Pantone color you want
Click Ok

how do you find a similar pantone colour for this CMYK color

Open the Color Picker
Input the CMYK values
Click the Color Libraries button

Photoshop will automatically choose the closest Pantone to your CMYK values.

Be Aware.....

Realize, actually creating a spot color file which separates correctly in Photoshop is an entirely different matter and requires the use of the Channels Panel. The steps above are merely to achieve the color of a Pantone swatch. Simply setting the color picker to a Pantone color, then applying it to a document will not create artwork which separates the spot plates properly.

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can you elaborate on your last point? Also, IIRC, pantone swatches are not loaded in a default PS install, correct? (they are there, just need to be loaded). –  horatio Nov 21 '12 at 15:44
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