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I'm trying to create a landing page, and the main image which I have in mind contains a blended combination of mixed abstract colors. Something like those images:

http://downloadsoftwarestore.com/software_images/00/19/00031900/Assorted-screenshot.jpg http://preview.canstockphoto.com/canstock4064326.png

However, it seems I'm not using the correct terms as I can't find really good examples. Could anybody please give a clue as to how this effect is called, in UI jargon perhaps?

Thanks.

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migrated from ui.stackexchange.com Mar 24 '11 at 0:57

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You should ask this on graphicdesign.stackexchange.com, not here. You'll more likely get the answer you are looking for there. –  Charles Boyung Mar 23 '11 at 22:12
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I'm not 100% sure this would be a great background image for a landing page - the thing about having so many colors in the background is that pretty much any font color is going to fade waaaaaay into the background. If you're going to do this I would either limit the colors in your Perlin generator or find a soft / abstract hue with only a couple of colors. –  lawndartcatcher Mar 24 '11 at 11:43
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These were the google image results for "soft hue gradient wallpaper"

Google image search results

'hue' and 'gradient' are the key industry terms, but it wasn't until i put 'wallpaper' that i got the results i was after.

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Those images look like they came from some sort of multi-color Perlin noise generator.

There's a good example of a Perlin noise generator here... http://kodierer.blogspot.com/2009/05/oscar-algorithm-silverlight-real-time.html

You could always start there and then tweak and refine in Photoshop to get the effect you're looking for.

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Maybe it's a greyscale Perlin noise image that's then been gradient mapped to colour? See also graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/1391/… –  e100 Mar 24 '11 at 14:52
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