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Is there any way to set bleeds in Illustrator of 5 cm? If I try to set it, it won't let me and tell that 2.5cm is the maximum allowed amount.

But the print company I'm going to send my prints to requires the files with 50mm bleeds.

How can I trick Illustrator into doing what I want?

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50mm bleed? What are they printing that requires that amount of tolerance - something very large? –  e100 Apr 20 '11 at 18:02
    
PVC banners and they use the bleeds to make the hem arround the border. Just want to send the data properly so that the visible area won't be larger or smaller in the end. –  user1118 Apr 21 '11 at 1:07
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4 Answers 4

Illustrator documents can have a very large document size that can encompass the entire layout with the bleeds, then place crop marks that show the trim and bleeds. In other words, don't rely on the document or artboard size itself, do the whole thing manually.

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To require that much bleed you must be printing something quite large. In that case, most of the time large prints requires a 150 DPI resolution so here's what I usually do in that case: I work with a 300 DPI resolution but with the document half-sized. If your document fully sized needs a 5cm bleed, then I presume if it's half sized it's going to be 2.5cm! Then you send your document to your printer and ask him to print it double sized and he'll have his 5cm bleed in a 150 DPI resolution. Plus if it's only vector you won't lose any resolution.

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Maximum automatically-prepared bleed for Illustrator is 72 pts.

You probably need to find out the size of the print material before they cut it, and manually prepare the bleeding & crop marks. No automatic fix... :(

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I agree, along with the advice that annie gave about doubling and vector art not losing quality, the other obvious option is to make your document the size of your desired docuent PLUS bleeds, and drop in your own trim and bleed marks. This is how we used to do it before computers, back in the stone age. –  horatio Apr 21 '11 at 13:48
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It has been my experience that building at half size is not the best option and should be avoided whenever possible. You can manually set crop marks by creating a rectangle the size of the total area with bleed and then create crop marks on that rectangle (Object >create trim marks). Then include the bleed area (with the crop marks) in an second artboard.

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Welcome to GD! Can you add any additional insight into why building at half-size causes problems and should be avoided? –  Farray Jan 7 '12 at 20:09
    
@Farray: if you include raster elements and forget to change your PDF output downsampling settings. –  e100 Feb 21 '12 at 15:00
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