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I generated on the internet this tartan design:

http://s1.postimg.org/fehxpxsr3/tartan_e7ea5e8fca4c195b1bc6ad18b3d6d866.png

Now I want to get this design as a vector graphic built in Adobe Illustrator. Is there a trick to get 45 degree lines on the squares?

Or does anybody has an tutorial on this?

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3 Answers 3

Here's my take..... and a little mini-tutorial.

Tartan
(If you right click on the image above and choose "Open image in new Tab/Window" you can see it a bit larger)

Save for web reduction does some odd appearance things to the diagonals, but they are all spaced evenly and dont' change color mid-stream like they appear to.

Be aware, creating too many tartan patterns will result in the ghost of William Wallace haunting you.
F R E E D O M ! ! ! (although his voice is much more soprano now)

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There are a bunch of lines patterns included with Illustrator, but they are a little hidden within the Swatch Libraries menu:

enter image description here

Select one you like. You can then rotate the pattern with the Rotate tool. You can double click on the Rotate tool and uncheck "Objects" so that only the pattern is rotated:

Rotate

Then use multiple fills with a blending mode to color the pattern:

Pattern

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No tricks, just basic shapes.

  1. Draw a line grid
  2. Create your square
  3. Clip the lines with the square
  4. Apply a background color to the square
  5. Dupe it and create your pattern.

Here's how I prefer to go about #1

  1. Draw a horizontal line (or shallow rectangle, sometimes easier for pixel alignment)
  2. Apply a Transform effect to create the other lines and their spacing
  3. Apply another Transform effect to rotate the grid to your angle

The upside to this approach is that it's dead simple to fine tune your line grid later by just tweaking the effects.

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