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I'd like to find similar fonts to Bebas (below):

enter image description here

What do you call these types of fonts? Thick, tall, and usually all in uppercase?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you're searching for fonts like that, look for condensed fonts. Traditionally used for cramming words into small spaces, they're more often used now for crisp bold blocky titles. Here's an article about using them well.

Tall font = narrow font, set at a large size.

Sounds like you're looking for condensed sans fonts with a fairly heavy weight.

Most font browsers will let you search on 'condensed' as a search term, and narrow by sans and weight using facets - some, like Typekit, will even let you put in 'Width', including narrow fonts that don't identify as condensed - https://typekit.com/fonts?classification=sans-serif&weight=heavy&width=condensed.

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I don't think they have a particular name.

I would probably call them Black, Heavy or Extra Bold fonts.

Typekit has a nice search tool that lets you browse by style (in this case sans-serif) and weight, among other properties.

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These fonts called "condensed" fonts. You can find some useful alternatives below.

Tungsten: http://www.typography.com/fonts/tungsten/overview/ (best alternative i think.)
Economica: (google font): http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Economica
Tulpen One (google font): http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Tulpen+One
Open Sans Condensed (google font): http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Open+Sans+Condensed
Six Caps (google font): http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Six+Caps

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