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I want to use a CC-BY-SA image in a printed newsletter. What is the most succinct and unobtrusive way I can comply with the license?

It would really clutter up my design to slap the creator's name, the title of the work, the type of license, the URL where I got the file, AND the URL of the license either on the image itself or as a caption, so one of the things I'm wondering is if I can pare down the amount of information I include in a print application or put it on a different page, almost like a works cited.

Most CC information inevitably talks about web use or some other form of computer file that allows clickable links or metadata to handle your attribution. Creativecommons.org handily offers some downloadable logos for use in print publications but not much further direction. Is there an authoritative reference detailing how to comply with these licenses on a non-clickable sheet of paper?

EDIT: Let me make this applicable to my specific use. I'm wanting to use a picture from Wikimedia Commons, which has the option to generate code for web use, but it includes this suggested attribution for the file in question:

By Groupe Canam (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Noticeably absent is the original URL where the file can be found, but this does include the photographer's name, the license, the URL where the license information can be viewed, and the (general) source of the image. Of course, the attribution text may be assuming internet use that involves a clickable link back to the file's original source. But would the above text, by any off chance, be adequate for print?

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Is your publication also under a CC license? –  Yisela Sep 26 '13 at 4:08
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In your situation I would contact the owner of the photo and ask for a different license. You may even want to pay for the right to use the picture with a license that is not covered by Creative Commons.

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This is probably a good solution in general but it's not practical for my particular case. It's a small print, mostly internal newsletter, the photo is from Wikimedia Commons, the photographer is French, I can use another photo in a pinch, and my deadline is in like two days. –  user15000 Sep 24 '13 at 16:48
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