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Here's my original logo image:

enter image description here

I want to create a diagonal cut effect as in the following :

enter image description here

What I'm currently doing is the following :

enter image description here

I'm making the illusion that the image is cut but using a rectangle (which is shown in red here but normally would be with white borders) that is rotated. Now, when I export the image in illustrator, I get the first image result. However, my problem is that this works well on a white background but does not on any other background since we clearly see the rectangle in white on a black background per say.

How can I manage to cut the edge of the rectangles to produce the desired effect without using a big rectangle that would be shown on a color background.

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How did you make the shape in the first place? If it's a raster image the method would be completely different than if it's made with path tools. –  DumbNic Oct 26 '13 at 15:08

3 Answers 3

Here are the basic steps based on Illustrator CS 5. It helps if you turn on the chessboard pattern in the background that makes transparent areas visible. (View > Show Transparency Grid).

1) First draw your frame objects using the pen tool or any of the shape drawing tools (rectangle, circle, etc.). This gives you vector paths, of which you adjust the stroke widths and colours as you like:

enter image description here

2) Then select and expand the path objects. Expanding means converting each thick and thin stroke into shape objects. (You might want to make a copy of the paths before this step, so you don't need to recreate it from scratch should you decide to change the stroke widths later on): Select everything and choose Object > Expand…:

3) To cut the shapes, draw a path (can be a line, a rectangle or circle, etc.) above the shape objects: e.g. use the Line Segment drawing tool and draw a line in your preferred angle, place it over the shapes where you want to cut: enter image description here

Then choose Object > Path > Divide Objects Below. This adds anchor points to the shape objects where the line you draw crosses them:

enter image description here

4) Now you can simply use the Direct Selection tool (white arrow) or the Lasso tool to select and discard the parts you don't want anymore (select + press the delete key):

enter image description here enter image description here

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Depending on your needs, you might also want to consider a clipping mask. It keeps the original elements intact but masks out what you want to hide.

  1. Draw your base shape (the three angled rules).
  2. Draw a triangle over it like a frame.
  3. Select all the objects (making sure your cropping/masking object is on top) and choose ObjectClipping maskMake.

Look up Clipping masks in the documentation. Interacting with them is not difficult but it is different from other types of objects

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You can use shapes for the lines, and subtract one of them. This method is useful to solve your issue using Photoshop:

enter image description here

By selecting your multiple shapes layer you can then click on subtract from the space area:

enter image description here

Then select the polygon tool, set sides to 3, drag the mouse to get the triangle shape in place, and subtract the shape.

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