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Can someone uncover the design process behind social network visualisations such as http://inmaps.linkedinlabs.com – and how those interconnecting Béziers are generated?

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I feel this is a bit of a broad question. You are asking basically how to do the entire project from concept, design through software development. And there certainly isn't one answer to you question. See it from this point: if I'd ask you "what have you tried?", what could you possibly answer? –  KMSTR Dec 12 '13 at 8:28
    
You need the data and some hints on network graphs, then you could write directly SVG (following a tutorial) or, simply, you can use Graphviz who is very simple to use and can generate SVG as well. It depends from your intents and your skills. –  Paolo Gibellini Dec 12 '13 at 8:46
    
I have added the UI part to the question, Thanks for pointing out. I would be specific in future. –  sudharshan Jan 3 at 12:15
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1 Answer

So those kind of network graphs are often called node link diagrams. This article might be a good place to start: The Links That Bind Us: Network Visualizations.

Except for very small datasets, I'd use a code library or tool that generates networks like this. D3 is a javascript library designed for creating complex visualisations like these. "Force directed" algorithms are popular for spacing things out nicely - here's an example with bezier curves.

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There are also pieces of desktop software that generate them without code and that often allow the nodes and links to be dragged around. Maltego Casefile is one free example. These tend to be more useful for aiding research and for rough 'data sketches' than for final designs, but they can be a handy tool.

Some of these can plug into social networks or parse email files directly: otherwise, you'll need to look up the appropriate API and do some coding.

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I am a newbie here I wish I have the credits to upvote, will do. Thanks for the answer, this is what I have asked. Will research further. –  sudharshan Jan 3 at 12:12
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