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I am very much interested to know how images with text of different sizes and fonts are created. Can any one please suggest any tutorial to ease the process?

word cloud

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That type of image is called a word cloud. They're very Web 2.0. –  OghmaOsiris Dec 30 '13 at 22:48
    
See also What is this style of jumbled, mixed words called? for some background –  user568458 Dec 31 '13 at 14:39

4 Answers 4

As others have already pointed out, these are called "word clouds".

Word clouds are essentially visual frequency tables of words, where the font size of the word is determined by the word frequency. Thus, to create the graphic, you first need a corpus (for example, a speech made by someone, a text file of all your blog posts, a data dump of all of your emails...). The text is parsed, and the frequency of words is tabulated. Based on the frequency of the words, an algorithm will determine how big the font should be relative to the other word frequencies.

More advanced versions of the software used to make these charts will allow you to first drop "stop words" or to aggregate the counts of singular and plural versions of a word (thus, "eye" and "eyes" will be counted together).

The easiest place to get started is "wordle" (linked in Leoni's answer) or Many Eyes. These let you enter the corpus directly, or they let you enter a previously weighted list in the form of word:frequency or even word:frequency:hexColor. If you are into data science and are comfortable with programming, you can also look at the open source R programming language and the "wordcloud" package.

While a bit of a craze, word clouds also have some shortcomings. The biggest one for me is that this suffers from the same problem that many choropleth maps suffer from. The algorithm to determine the relative font size of the words does that only based on the frequency. It doesn't take into consideration the length of the word. So, in the example you've given, "innovation" and "original" seem to be the same font size, but the area covered by these is different since "innovation" is a longer word.

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+1 for this as it speaks to how rather than just linking. The "enter the corpus directly" paragraph is the useful part for those of us who want to mimic the look and tweak the outcome: you can start out with all frequencies at unity and then manually set the frequencies much higher for the words you want to emphasize. All keywords get 1000, all fluff is 1, the "brand halo" of words that marketing like are 200-500 –  horatio Jan 2 at 16:54

You can generate that kind of graphic at http://www.wordle.net/.

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this would be better to put as a comment than an answer. –  Ryan Dec 30 '13 at 23:37
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  OghmaOsiris Dec 31 '13 at 1:37
    
I flagged this erroneously. My apologies. This is a nice resource for someone who wants to make word clouds. –  Brendan Dec 31 '13 at 13:46

There is a script for InDesign called Wordalizer to do this kind of thing yourself. It was made as a tribute to the Wordle online service.

enter image description here

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The answer above is correct but if you really wanna do this manually, it requires practice and creativity. I mean, it would be easier if you draw it on paper first and trace it on Photoshop or Illustrator like this one http://www.skillshare.com/classes/design/Digitizing-Hand-Lettering-From-Sketch-to-Vector-Lettering-II/214693817 but if you wanna do it manually with just fonts and sizes and colors, you'd have to practice extensively. I myself have to admit that I'm not good at it either.

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