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I am new to Paint.Net and first thing that I would like to learn is how to re-size existing Shape. Please refer below image. Here I have two rectangles in two different layers, I would like to re-size or say change any of their properties (like color).

My understanding is that I need go to their layer first and then click on Tools -> "Some Selection Control" and then it should allow me to change properties of the rectangle (like size or color). I have already tried all of the existing selection controls but wasn't able to find any control which will let me select that rectangle only and will let me change the properties. enter image description here

I searched on Google as well as Paint.Net forums but didn't find any helpful answer. I have already referred below links

I used to use Photoshop and it was pretty straight forward in Photoshop, in there it would allow you to select existing shape and change its properties easily (like size, color). Just referring Photoshop to explain my question :)

Thanks in advance for your time and help :)

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I know very little of paint, but surely, a simple google search would give you the answer, in some basic tutorial? –  Benteh Jan 9 '14 at 21:10
@boblet: I tried Google and even searched all the forums of Paint.Net but wasn't able to find any information. You may have already noticed reference links in my questions. –  ndd Jan 9 '14 at 21:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted is a basic bitmap-only application without vector tools. When you draw shapes, they are pixel-based and can't be rescaled or reshaped anymore. You should consider using a more sophisticated application, e.g., RealWorld Paint 2013, GIMP, Inkscape (vector-based), or what have you...

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@TehMacDwag: That explains why I can't find the answer :) Looks like I have to use something else. Thanks. –  ndd Jan 9 '14 at 21:36

protected by Darth_Vader Apr 20 at 18:11

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