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I am a one-day veteran at Inkscape, making some avatars/profile-pics, and also a complete nitwit concerning graphic design. I want to end up with 1024x1024 and 2048x2048 png files. Although I guessed my way through, and most things seem to work out, I am still wondering about some of the settings. In particular, I am somewhat surprised by the grid behaviour, which doesn't seem accurate or otherwise not really helpful. Which, for this purpose, are the right settings (in all the dialog boxes below)? I am also not clear on the meaning of dpi in this context.

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Ignore the DPI setting. All that matters is your width/height settings. As for your grid settings, they seem fine. Is there something in particular you're having issues with in terms of the grids? –  DA01 Feb 17 at 18:47
    
@DA01 1) When I decrease the 'Major grid line every' to 16 or 8 or 4, it doesn't seem to work (they don't get closer to each other), only from 32 and up it behaves as expected. 2) Visually, the grid doesn't seem to line up with the area, which I had in multiples of the major grid lines. (Is there some kind of offset, when snapping, that doesn't affect the end result?) –  Glen The Udderboat Feb 17 at 18:51
    
@DA01 I can't get an ellipse to snap onto the grid lines. :( –  Glen The Udderboat Feb 17 at 19:40
    
object snapping is still a bit confusing to me in Inkscape...there are SO many options. Play with some of the snap options in the snap toolbar. –  DA01 Feb 17 at 19:47
    
as for grid lines, note that they disappear as you zoom out if they are just to dense. For example, you may not see gridlines every 4px unless you zoom in enough. –  DA01 Feb 17 at 19:48

1 Answer 1

All pixel measurements, including resolution, before the "export" step are merely helpers for one to have an idea of the size. They are not binding to the final image size in anyway.

If you want 1024x1024 or 2048x2048 png files, before the export step, make a square selection around your subjects, and on the export screen mark the "custom" tab, and type in suitable x0 and y1 values, and wiodth and height values so that your "custom" image area is square.

tehn type the desired output size in the "width/height" fields of the "bitmap size" section - watch as the DPI setting adjusts automatically - no need to change that.

That is it - just hit the export button.

If you need precise pixel alignment for some color boundaries, inkscape can really provide that, as the shapes are anti-aliased at their boundaries when rendering the output. Open the resulting image in GIMP, and find way to harden your edges using the colors' menu (for example, posterizing, or using the curves tool) as you need.

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