Take the 2-minute tour ×
Graphic Design Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for Graphic Design professionals, students, and enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I apologize if this is not the right place to ask this question, but I thought the graphic designers can give me an idea for my problem.

I need to make a diagram for completion-review-revision-approval process of technical drawings.

The diagram needs to show both the process milestones (completion-review-revision-approval) and also their schedule distributed on weeks.

However I cannot imagine graphically how can I show both the milestones and the schedule.

For example:

There are 3 drawings lets say,

Drawing A will be

completed between Week 1-3 reviewed between Week 3-4 revision between Week 4-5 Approved on Week 6

Drawing B will be

completed between Week 1-4 reviewed between Week 4-5 revision between Week 5-6 Approved on Week 7

Drawing C will be

completed between Week 3-5 reviewed between Week 5-6 revision between Week 6-7 Approved on Week 8

As you can understand, the milestone dates of drawings are distributed into the weeks and intersecting with each other.

For example, while the revision of Drawing B is going on, Drawing A is already approved.

Normally we show these process with Gantt chart but I am looking for alternative cool ideas.

I hope explanation of my question is clear to you.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Howabout a Gantt chart was pretty hot stuff in the 1910, but very used in timetables since then. You can do pretty cool cant charts. –  joojaa Mar 18 at 19:01
2  
So, as I interpret it, the question is basically, "How can I better display data?" We're visual people around here :) Showing what you have or would traditionally create, will go a long way to gaining some alternative methods to display the same data. –  Scott Mar 18 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

From a graphic design perspective, it's good to keep in mind that what is familiar is what communicates most easily. People don't like finding they have to decode something that ought to be instantly intuitive. That said...

Since you have dependencies in this process (a drawing can't be approved until it's been reviewed and revised, all drawings must be approved before the process is complete), you could represent it with a simple critical path or PERT diagram (not necessarily like the one below).

enter image description here

The boring old, standard old Gantt chart can also be spiffed up a bit, perhaps along these lines, using a different color set for each track, or using color to represent each of the different processes on the various document timelines.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.