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It is practically impossible to edit a white illustration on the default white artboard background.

Hiding the artboard makes the whole work area receive the artboard's white color.

Is there a way to change the color of the artboard in Illustrator CC?

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I would also like to know if there's a way to do this. In the meantime what I do is make a rectangle or square shape that covers the artboard's dimensions, fill with the colour I want for background and lock it so I can work over it. –  Alis Klar May 11 at 12:31
    

4 Answers 4

There's no simple way that I know of.
You can, however, create a rectangle of the same dimensions as the artboard, change its colour to one that works better, move it to the back (cmd+[) - or even to a lower layer - and lock it.
It's not a perfect solution, I know, but it works for me.

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You can "tweak" the artboard color by this way:

Select File->Document Setup...

On the popup window you will have Transparency sub-menu:

enter image description here

Choose the upper color (I set it to rose) and Mark "Simulate Colored Paper" -

You will get this image -

enter image description here

There is no any other layers except of text ones...

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Unfortunately, that doesn't help with this question, which is how to make white visible. White text will disappear against the artboard, regardless of its color. –  Alan Gilbertson May 11 at 20:28
    
@alangilbertson i dont delete the answer because of your very interesting comment –  Ilan May 12 at 6:19
    
No, Alan, the question is "Is there a way to change the color of the artboard in Illustrator CC?" It's in bold. You can read it for yourself. White is used as an example. And White is not white. There's CMYK white (absence of ink) and HSB and RGB White (Additive Blended Light becomes white). In the case of HSB and RGB, they'll be clearly visible on a coloured artBoard. But Adobe doesn't provide this because they're... lazy? –  Confused May 12 at 9:07
    
Thanks for the answer. This is pretty nifty otherwise, but as mentioned I have a problem editing white vectors, so this approach does not remedy that. –  kontur May 12 at 11:16

The short answer is no, you can't, but there is a reason for that which becomes apparent the moment you look at a CMYK "white" swatch. It's 0% everything: no ink.

White, to Illustrator, is not a color or a mixture of colors, it is an absence of ink. Even if you're working with an RGB document, that's still the way Illustrator thinks about color: white = absence.

When setting a layout to be printed with white pigment, such as for screen printing on clothing, or product labels that are printed directly onto glass or plastic, the artwork is usually submitted as black or a faux spot color with instructions to print using white. It's similar to the way that spot varnish is specified on a layout. The important thing is that it will separate on its own plate, not what color it appears to be on the screen.

That's why ilan's solution won't work for you. If you simulate colored paper, then anything white will still disappear, because that's how Illustrator shows you that the paper will show through -- there's no pigment.

Your two solutions are to put a colored rectangle on a non-printing layer beneath your artwork, or temporarily change all your white fills or strokes to something visible for editing purposes, then change it back when you're ready to save.

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You can change your background to white or a darker color, depending on the color of your Interface. Sadly there is no option to define your own background-color.

The path to the setting is preferences -> user interface.
Here is a screenshot, where to find it (in the german version):

<code>Settings screenshot</code>

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