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I need to create a perfect circle with the bezier tool and not with the circle tool. The purpose of this is to later animate my svg with css.

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I wish to note that Bézier curves cannot represent a perfect circle (they can do pretty good approximations though). – Wrzlprmft Oct 15 at 13:43
@Wrzlprmft Why not? – Scribblemacher Oct 15 at 14:35
@Scribblemacher: Bézier curves are polynomial curves and a circle isn’t. It all boils down to the sine function not being a polynome. (A rough analogy is that you cannot represent π as a fraction.) – Wrzlprmft Oct 15 at 14:41
@Scribblemacher Trigonometric functions are part of a group called trancendental functions which can not be described by polynomials. The accuracy is described well in anyway you could use rational splines (Beziers or b-splines which are called NURBS) to make accurate circle arcs (altough they arent paramerized as circles are) – joojaa Oct 15 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When drawing a citcle in Inkscape then this will be its path enter image description here:

enter image description here

To convert this path to Bezier lines just select the object, then choose Path > Object to Path:

enter image description here

We can now insert nodes, break paths or whatever there is we need to do (below example was obtained by inserting 3 nodes and deleting the path between two selected nodes):

enter image description here

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Select the ellipse tool , draw a circle (with 'Ctrl') and now - with the ellipse tool still selected - hover over the 3 visible nodes of the circle and read the hints in the status line: you can position the start and end point of the circle to create a segment, and with the toggle on the ellipse controls bar you can determine if it's a segment (closed, filled path including the center) or an arc (unclosed shape).

Taken from This Post on the Inkscape forums.

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