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I'm trying to reproduce this customer's logo which they made years ago. I supposed to reproduce it in Photoshop but I can't get the effect right. Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated.

die-cast gold metal

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That looks more like a photo to me :p –  Johannes Oct 27 '11 at 0:05
    
of course its a foto but there is that gold-ish effect on it which im not sure how to make –  Tomasz Golinski Oct 27 '11 at 0:10
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In all sincerity I doubt just "a few buttons were pushed" to create this effect. In addition to that I find it curious that if your customer has these photoshop skills as to easily create this logo to begin with why they just don't do it themselves. My hunch is that your customer isn't really being 100% honest with you, but that's my own personal opinion and is off-topic. Either way, I'm not here to discuss the integrity of your customer. Going back to my first comment however, I meant that the entire image looks like a photo -- gold-ish effect included. –  Johannes Oct 27 '11 at 0:29
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Johannes isn't that far off... if you want an image of something with a gold layer on it, go buy a soccer ball and cleats, pick up some gold paint, spray the items, and photograph them. (And expense it all to the client who can't be bothered to tell you what magic Goldfinger filter he found in Photoshop 6.) –  Lauren Ipsum Oct 27 '11 at 0:43
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"I just picked up some normal pictures on internet, pressed few buttons in PS and I got this look" = umm...that's usually a sign that it's time to design a real logo that's not using lifted imagery and cheesy photoshop effects. –  DA01 Oct 27 '11 at 1:36
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3 Answers

http://www.amazon.com/Gold-Soccer-Ball-Cleat-Charm/dp/B001E2338E?tag=blog.magic-20

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oh, WOW. nice job, horatio. –  Lauren Ipsum Oct 28 '11 at 14:55
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Hah! I had a feeling johannes might be right about the client possibly not being 100% honest about it. ( note to self never piss off horatio because he will find me eventually. ) –  Joonas Oct 28 '11 at 16:42
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You've prompted quite a discussion! An answer would be a lot easier if you put up the original photo, but let's take things at face value.

The client says they "pushed a few buttons." That immediately suggests that they went to the Styles panel and picked something from there (since a style is simply a collection of layers effects you can apply with a single click), or applied a single layer style such as "gradient overlay" with its blend mode changed.

From the appearance of the finished image, this looks like brass, from the metal gradients, applied in Overlay or Color Burn mode, or with slightly reduced Opacity, using the "Reflected" gradient setting. Those are the exact colors of the default brass gradient. From there, either the angle of the gradient was changed slightly, or the image has been rotated. Fairly primitive. (On close inspection, it actually looks like two images with the same effect applied at different angles.)

A while back, I had a very similar request from a client. They have their logo foil stamped on their stationery, and wanted something on their website that would better imitate the embossed gold metallic look than what was there already, plus a drop shadow (everybody needs drop shadows, don't y'know). I had the original vector art from the amazing Mike Manoogian, who designed so many iconic band, magazine and company logos "back in the day," as he puts it, so I did at least have something clean to work with.

We went from this:

ets logo before

to this:

ets logo after

There are two layers involved, one for the logo itself and a plain circle shape layer for the center, both with the same color (#e2ce5e) overlay applied in Color mode over different black-and-white gradients -- simple for the center circle, complex for the rest -- then appropriate Bevel and Emboss above that on each layer. Stacking color on top of a gradient tends to produce a much more metallic-looking effect than the "metallic" gradients that ship with Photoshop. Adding a Curves layer above that can dramatically increase apparent gloss, too, although that wasn't the effect we were looking for in this particular case.

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