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I've took some photographs at a photoshoot last week. The lighting conditions weren't right for the shoot (my fault entirely) and the camera we used was a compact. Unfortunately this means that the photograph is quite grainy. Anyone know a good Photoshop (or similar) technique to improve this?

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closed as off topic by PearsonArtPhoto Feb 9 '11 at 19:10

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Could you rephrase the headline as a question? –  e100 Jan 18 '11 at 13:37
    
@e100 - jeez your really cracking down on me ;) –  Dan Hanly Jan 18 '11 at 13:47
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This one should be moved to the photography site... –  PearsonArtPhoto Jan 24 '11 at 15:33
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The question isn't really about "graphic design". It is better suited for the Photo Stack Exchange site. Unfortunately, I cannot migrate it while the site is in beta so I suggest re-asking the question there. –  Robert Cartaino Jan 25 '11 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Filter > Noise > Reduce noise.

Reducing noise usually blurs the pixels making the image less sharp. play with the sliders to strike a good balance between sharpness and noise reduction

If the image is shot in RAW (unlikely on a compact) then Camera RAW v6 brought significant updates to the noise reduction engine. You'll get a better result removing noise from the RAW before you bring it into photoshop.

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Maybe push it in the other direction. Leverage the lo-fi-ness of it and further tweak the imagery in that direction?

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