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I design emoticons, and often I need to resize things. However, this usually needs to be done without anti-aliasing. I can't find anywhere to do this.

It's kind of backward, as it's actually harder for a program to use anti-aliasing than not. It also means I need to spend lots of time hand-pixelling everything twice as large.

I'd especially prefer a way that this can be done within Photoshop CS3, though it's not required.

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possible duplicate of Resizing rectangle without losing sharpness –  Farray Jan 17 '12 at 1:27
    
I'm inclined to agree, but I'm not dead certain what "without anti-aliasing" means in this specific context. Can you clarify, preferably with an example or two? A link is okay. –  Alan Gilbertson Jan 17 '12 at 6:28
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I can't provide a visual aid at the moment (I will later today) but let's say I have a 5x5 pixel image. I want to increase the size to 10x10 (and thereby scale it up 2x) but without any anti-aliasing occurring between pixels. –  timothymh Jan 17 '12 at 10:45
    
Never mind. It's been answered. :) –  timothymh Jan 17 '12 at 21:34
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming you're scaling up by integer multiples, as per your example, this is easy enough. In the Photoshop resize dialog, just choose Resample image: Nearest Neighbor.

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Thank you so much! That's perfect and exactly what I needed! I can't believe it was right in front of me the whole time. :D –  timothymh Jan 17 '12 at 21:33
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Why not use vector based graphics which would allow infinite resizing without loss of quality?

There are free programs like Inkscape or payed programs like Adobe Illustrator. With these you will be able to make the graphic to a specific height/width then rasterize (the process of turning mathematically defined lines to pixels) the final to a jpeg or whatever file form you need.

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No, thank you. I'm starting out with a bitmap image, and converting bitmap to vector is a bit of a hassle. –  timothymh Jan 17 '12 at 10:42
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