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I have a blog on blogspot.com - mentioning this so you may know I don't really have a lot of font options! Anyway - In my blog, I want the body font to be Georgia. What should be the Header font with it? I like georgia so much that I could very well choose it for the headers as well; but I want a sans font for that purpose. I have tried Verdana, but that looks somewhat boring along with Georgia. Any suggestions?

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get the Georgia a bit higher this will look good for your header as you like the Georgia most :) –  Jack Mar 7 '12 at 11:46
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I think this is too specific of a question and was already covered in this discussion: graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/1797/… –  Ryan Mar 7 '12 at 16:21
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2 Answers 2

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It's all a matter of exercising some taste but some good combinations with Georgia in my experience are Helvetica, Helvetica Neue, Arial (purists will tell you no, but you've got to be pragmatic sometimes), and Lucida Grande. I don't know what the exact font limitations are on Blogspot, but I'm sure you'll be able to find something in there to finish a tasteful design.

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I actually really like Georgia with Arial. But when titles are Georgia and body is Arial, I haven't actually tried the other way around... –  Yisela Sep 5 '12 at 21:59
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Arimo Bold 72px

I too am hosted by Blogger. I too use Georgia as my preferred serif font. I too have a taste for Helvetica-like sans-serif fonts. My companion sans-serif font stack, which includes the Google font Arimo (illustrated above), is

"Helvetica Neue", HelveticaNeue, TeXGyreHeros, FreeSans, "Nimbus Sans L", "Liberation Sans", Arimo, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;

except for large non-italic headings, for which I insert "Microsoft Sans Serif" ahead of "Liberation Sans". I give my reasons in "A multiplatform Helvetica-like font stack that suppresses Arial".

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