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I'm trying to figure out how to draw the below circle. I've looked through all my brushes, and I definitely don't have it. Is that what that is? A brush? Is it something I need to purchase? It seems so simple, but I can't figure it out.

Thanks!

Karli

enter image description here

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Have you tried using a regular dashed line with a very narrow dash length? That should work. – Cai Jan 8 at 18:50

I took Cai Morris' idea and gave it a try. Use the Dashed Line controls in the Stroke panel - applying relatively thin dashes (I used 1pt) and a thick stroke width (I used 18) Dashed Lines

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Here's an alternative to the dashed stroke trick using the transform effect.

It's not quite as easy as a dashed stroke, but it has two advantages:

  1. It also works for things other than straight lines
  2. It keeps the lines perfectly straight. It's not particularly visible at this size, but using dashed strokes, the lines taper slightly. This becomes visible if the lines are longer or wider, for example:

    enter image description here


Here's what to do:

  1. Make the line (or, whatever you want to repeat), plus a copy of it the diameter of your desired circle away. Make that copy transparent, then group them:

    enter image description here

  2. Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform

  3. Tick Preview
  4. Put the "Rotation" up to a small number and then whack the "Copies" up until you have just over or under a complete circle (holding the up arrow with the numbers field selected makes this easy)

    enter image description here

  5. Tweak it until it's roughly how you want it - don't worry just yet if the ends of the circle are messy (like the right-hand join in this example)

    enter image description here

  6. When you like the spacing, bring the number of copies down to the lowest you can without having an incomplete circle, then set the rotate angle to 360 divided by this number of copies (in my example, it's 360 divided by 51 = 7.06).

    enter image description here

That's it!


The nice thing about this is, you can double-click into the original group and edit the shapes in any way, at any time, and they'll all update instantly, so you have complete control and can make any edits any time. You can turn it into a ring of anything...

enter image description here

...and if it is just straight lines you want, they stay constant, there's absolutely no tapering unless you add it manually:

enter image description here

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It is not a brush from what I can tell. However this can be solved simply.

First create a circle about the size you need it to be (this will be used as a guide).

Then create a vertical line (similar in length to the ones in the circle), and align the top point to the top edge of the circle.

Then with just your stroke selected use the rotate tool (R) and alt click the center of the circle.

This pulls up the rotate tool's dialogue box. Specify the angle (I used 2 degrees) and then click copy.

Once it has copied once, you can hold down Command + D (Control + D for PC) and repeat it until it makes a full circle.

Example:

enter image description here

Play with the angle degrees for larger or closer widths between lines.

This works with any path or shape.

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A better way to do the same thing is with the super-useful transform effect - I'll add an answer explaining it, just a minute... – user568458 Jan 8 at 22:23

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