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In an image like the one below, the graphics are organized very neatly. The mugs are aligned horizontally and vertically, the text below is centered with the mug, as well as the text in the mug itself...

Anyway, with what software is all this done? I know this is probably very simple, but I have no clue...

enter image description here

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This question seems somehow a bit vague to me. –  Joonas Mar 27 '12 at 7:50
    
I LOVE this graphic, by the way. :) –  Lauren Ipsum Mar 27 '12 at 10:09
    
@Walkerneo, did any of these answers help you out? –  Ananda Mahto May 5 '12 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Snap to grid might not be the concept you're looking for. You might be looking for a menu item named something like "align and distribute", which is found in many almost any decent drawing, painting, or desktop-publishing program. (You can even find it in some office programs.)

Just be sure to pay attention to what you're using as the "anchor" for aligning and distributing your graphics--it might be the page, the first item you selected, the last item you selected, and so on. You might also need to group some of your objects to make sure that things align properly.

This is what the toolset for align and distribute looks like in Inkscape.Inkscape's "align and distribute" toolset

You'll notice that under "distribute", there are different options for distributing, such as equal distance between left edges, equal distances between midpoints, equal distances between right edges, and so on.

It's a very useful and regularly used tool for me, so I recommend experimenting with it a little to get the hang of how it works.

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+1: the text centring indicates A+D rather than snap-to-grid. –  e100 Mar 27 '12 at 17:12

Could be done in practically any software. Most applications have guides and grids and the ability to snap to them. All it takes is care when constructing.

If I were creating that graphic, I'd use Adobe Illustrator... create one cup, then set it as a symbol and duplicate it as many times as are needed.

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