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I'm trying to increase the PPI of my logo using Adobe Illustrator, but when I export it the image dimensions that should be 131x31 increase to 268×64. How can I fix it?

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How exactly are you trying to increase resolution with Illustrator? Illustrator is a resolution independent application and the only place it even mentions resolution is the Document Raster Effects Settings (DRES). And the DRES has absolutely nothing to do the placed or linked raster images. –  Scott Apr 1 '12 at 18:09
    
on that export options that shows 72ppi and etc –  dcalixto Apr 1 '12 at 19:06
    
Is the logo vector or simply a placed raster image? What are you using to check the resolution afterwards? –  Scott Apr 1 '12 at 19:16
    
is not a raster just a simple text logo without drawings, well to check is just open the image, the illustrator saves it much more bigger than i would :/ –  dcalixto Apr 1 '12 at 19:20
    
"open the image" with what????? Not all apps read ppi settings and only read dimensions. For some apps a higher ppi setting simply means the dimensions increase. Like a digital camera... more megapixels doesn't mean higher resolution image, it means a larger image. –  Scott Apr 1 '12 at 19:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's good to remember that as far as Creative Suite vector applications are concerned, 1 pixel = 1/72nd of an inch (1 point). If your image is 500x50 points (or even 500x50 pixels!) wide in Illustrator, it will export at that pixel dimension only if you export at 72 ppi.

If you need a higher resolution version at the same printed output dimensions, then after you have exported the image, take it into Photoshop and change the dimensions to what you want using Image > Image Size. Be sure to uncheck "Resample Image" in the dialog.

You tagged this question website-design. If this is truly what you want to do with the image, you should not be concerned with ppi at all. It is a meaningless value when applied to a web image. See this discussion for details of the difference between ppi and dpi, and this one related to web images.

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humm thank's Alan, i'll check it out :) –  dcalixto Apr 3 '12 at 12:51

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