Take the 2-minute tour ×
Graphic Design Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for Graphic Design professionals, students, and enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Are there any tools or online services where I can that I can feed a logo and get a series of variations using different effects?

For example: A reflection effect OR a shadow effect OR depth effect.

It's time consuming to manually give effects to a logo; automation would make my life easier and I could get as many variations of my logos as it could process.

share|improve this question
2  
do you mean "other than Photoshop"? –  Lauren Ipsum May 5 '12 at 12:01
    
Actually, I don't think this is a bad question. Or at least it could attract some good answers. –  e100 Nov 1 '12 at 12:13
    
@e100 It's a legitimate question, shouldn't be closed, but without more context, it does also sound at first like a really bad idea. I'm guessing (hoping) this is part of some kind of web service jitendra111 is developing that displays existing logos in something like a gallery. Hopefully jitendra111 doesn't want to churn out semi-automated logos without spending any time or care on them. jitendra111: it sounds like your problem is an unusual one, so it'll be easier for people to answer if you can share some more background and context - what you are doing and why. –  user568458 Nov 1 '12 at 13:32
add comment

2 Answers 2

I´m not aware of any web services with that description, but mainly because you didn´t specify the format or they way it would work. Would it be pngs, vectors? Being web, I could only think of css shadows and such, but it´s difficult to answer without more information (and css can´t handle transparency shadows anyway).

If you have access to Photoshop (or The Gimp), you can create actions for your logos. Maybe start with some 2-elements combinations (like shadow - emboss) and work from there.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want partial automation but to retain some control, look for a guide to Illustrator or Photoshop actions (ideally, Illustrator working with logos in vector format rather than Photoshop, so it's possible to have consistent variants at other sizes, for print, etc etc). There are loads of guides and tutorials out there. The basic principle is, actions are a bit like macros. You record what you do, then you can do it again with a button press or keyboard shortcut.

If you want to program complete automation for raster images headed for the web, the tool would be ImageMagick. Open source, requires some programming skills to use.

If you want to make good logos, then PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE DON'T automate any part of logo creation or formatting unless there are very very unusual rare circumstances (maybe if you need to put something like a white outline around lots of existing logos before putting them on some logo gallery site... can't think of any other example).

If you're creating logos, it's seriously not a good idea to blindly trust automation at any stage instead of spending mere minutes getting that effect right for that case. A logo for even a tiny company will be seen tens of thousands of times, hundreds of thousands of times a year. Even divided between each variant, that's a lot of views, so small investments of time will pay off.

Also, if the variants aren't sufficiently consistent that they are instantly recognizable as different forms of the same thing, it can (if you are lucky) seem sloppy and make a company seem less professional or (if you are unlucky) confuse people who don't realize this is the same company they encountered before, losing the trust-building familiarity that is one of the main benefits of having a good logo. Varying logos should be done with care (see for example this question on logo colour variants).

9 times out of 10 effects like drop shadows in a logo will be a bad idea that would add noise and reduce clarity (see this question on effects in logos for more detail). Assuming yours is a rare case where it does make sense, at the very least, consider using something like actions where you can check and tweak that each time it works. Even if you're just batching a load of other people's logos - you'll look bad if someone else's logo is noticeably worsened on your site.

Logo design is something where it really, really pays to get it right first time.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.