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Fireworks and Photoshop are both great.

I'd would like to know how to achieve similar results to Photoshop's clipping masks in Fireworks (I don't have as much experience using Fireworks as I do using Photoshop). There's two examples below. What's the best way to create them in Fireworks, preferably while maintaining edibility and ability to losslessly scale (so no bitmap conversion)?

Example 1

Photoshop clipping mask

In Photoshop CS6, this could also be constructed using a group clipping mask (it's a bit more awkward, but there's reasons why you may want to do that).

Photoshop group clipping mask

Example 2

A big advantage to using a clipping mask is being able to apply layer styles to the entire group of layers, while maintaing a great render order and antialiasing.

I don't know what the best approach for this would be in Fireworks.

Photoshop clipping mask with layer styles


Please shower me with your shape layer masking tips for Fireworks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I provide a link to an image (I cannot upload here cause Im new user) with the 3 simple steps. It is all done in vector, therefore scalable. No bitmaps.

enter image description here

Hope it helps someone.

Cheers

PS - Obviously, where I say "know" in the 3rd step, I meant "need". :)

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Thanks for the great reply. Your example may demonstrate what I feared — that Fireworks' masking can't work exactly like Photoshop. Please see the difference in the blue antialiased edge: i.imgur.com/VvEoE.png ...the edge on the Fireworks image is a little bit grey. I hope I'm wrong and it's possible to get results that are as clean as PS. –  Marc Edwards Nov 26 '12 at 10:03
    
Hi Marc..No no, dont get it wrong. The effect I applyed is random... and it is grey cause I added a GREY GLOW to it. Fireworks can do absolutley the same. You just have to try among the filters and apply the one you prefer. I was just telling you how to mask and apply any given filter, which I thought was the question. –  Isabel Nov 26 '12 at 10:06
    
Yep, that definitely was the question and I think you've answered it well! The issue is that Fireworks is masking the blue and yellow circles, then the grey circle and compositing them as two elements. Photoshop is clipping the entire thing at the end, giving cleaner edges. (Maybe I need to investigate Fireworks a bit more to see if it does what I want.) –  Marc Edwards Nov 26 '12 at 10:10
    
Yes, but I think that is the result of my decision of giving a glow to the masked circles and no effect at all to the grey one. You can also apply the desired effect to the whole element (blue, yellow and grey circle) if that is what you want. Have in mind Fireworks does everything you need from this point of view and with the best results, it is just a metter of finding out how. –  Isabel Nov 26 '12 at 10:15
    
I add another screenshot with 2 masked circles into a 3rd one and applying inner and outer glows to the whole group. There are many other possibilities, like for example feathering the edges of the mask. i49.tinypic.com/2cfqgk4.png –  Isabel Nov 26 '12 at 10:42

A great way to mask effects is using graphic symbols, you get to edit the inner elements like in an isolated mode on illustrator and still have a clean mask; the only thing is that it doesn't accept blend modes inside the symbol.

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This is a little short on information; please edit and expand a little. Screenshots are always good.. –  Random O'Reilly Apr 14 at 13:41

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