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I found this nice tutorial that explains how to convert a movie file to a .gif in Photoshop. Is there an analogous process in Illustrator?

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Mp4 and gif are both raster format. Why would you want to go via Illustrator, which is mostly a vector editor? –  naught101 Aug 6 '12 at 23:01
    
@naught101 So that I can make frame-by-frame vector art without first going through Photoshop. –  BBz Aug 7 '12 at 17:17
    
@naught101 How would you suggest I improve my question? The absence of a feature is difficult to confirm because there's often no documentation explicitly explaining its absence. Scott answered my question perfectly. –  BBz Aug 7 '12 at 17:20
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I've not seen any direct tutorials. The secret to blends and non-standard shapes is small steps. It's better to blend between 4 objects than it is 2. If you're drawing frames, it may save a step or two, but it most likely won't be the be-all-end-all solution. –  Scott Aug 8 '12 at 19:56
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@BBz: search the web for "vector rotoscoping" –  naught101 Aug 9 '12 at 0:56
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

Illustrator has no animation set up specifically. There's no structure to interpret existing animation or video within Illustrator.

In fact, the only places Illustrator even remotely addresses any sort of animation is in the ability to build layers in a sequence, and to export to swf format (Flash).

Illustrator can not interpret a video file in any way. Therefore an .mp4 would mean nothing to Illustrator. Illustrator won't even recognize an mp4 file.

Illustrator is also incapable of building gif animations. Even starting from scratch, there is no method to build a timeline or frame animation within Illustrator.

There's nothing you can do with an mp4 in Illustrator and you can not create animated gif files with Illustrator either.

In short... No. There's no analogous processes with Illustrator.

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