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Some time ago I managed to add this text (see below) to a logo at 512 x 512 px. I reproduced the black text using Arial Bold 200 with kerning at -20 in Paintshop Pro.

However, if I try to feather, expand or contract in Paintshop Pro or Photoshop, I end up with a much more rounded inner area (shown in white below). I've also tried using a smaller font, but I can't get it to match the right size of the black border.

My question is, how do I produce the outlined text (as shown below), where the black text is at the size mentioned above, in Paintshop Pro or Photoshop?

I need to generate a much larger image, 1024 x 1024 px, so I can't just scale it up as it will look awful.

Note that although I have scaled up this image for the benefit of this question, the text is anti-aliased in the final image.

enter image description here

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it might be beyond Photoshop's capabilities. The effect can't be done with usual border algorithms, since they'll always fail at the corners for this. They treat corners as points, and draw an arc with the set radius around it, thus making things round.

There might be an outline font for that somewhere, or you could try to find another program to do it.

Adobe Illustrator works quite nicely:

Word FREE outlined

White background with black stroke on default settings (Miter Join for corners).

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@Jules, you can get identical results with free Inkscape too, though the interface is a bit confusing at first. Had to download and test it just for this... :-) –  Hrulga Sep 5 '12 at 21:32
    
Just before I accept this answer I'd like to add a note, just I case I lose my notes or it may help someone else. Once you have added the text and got it the right size. Click the object menu and select fill / stroke, a dialog will appear. Set the inner most colour on the first tab and the outer colour on the second tab and on the third tab select a width 13.4, mitre of 4 was set for me by default –  Jules Sep 6 '12 at 12:56

@Jules: You can do it in Photoshop CS6, but it's a little unintuitive.

  1. Type your text
  2. Select Text > Convert to Shape
  3. Select any of the Shape tools
  4. In the (Shape Tool) Option Bar, change the Stroke to a color (and size)
  5. Click on the line next to Stroke, this is your Stroke Properties
  6. Set the properties as you'd like

Done... and non-destructive (except for the converting the text to a shape).

I hope this helps. Cheers!

enter image description here

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Are you sure this is in Photoshop CS6? Your screenshot appears to be from Illustrator. –  thenonhacker Aug 7 at 5:58

Convert shape to smart object and set minimum, Look here!

http://layersmagazine.com/ask-dave-podcast-get-square-corners-on-a-stroke-that%E2%80%99s-outside-rather-than-inside.html

  1. Select the text or shape.
  2. Convert to smart object.
  3. Filter -> Other -> Minimum.
  4. Set "Minimum" to desired stroke width. (ex: 15)
  5. Click OK
  6. Set stroke to the same width. (ex: 15)

For more complex shapes with a large number of corners,

  1. Duplicate layer containing shape or text
  2. Select bottom layer
  3. Repeat steps 1-5 as listed above.
  4. Set bottom shape layer style to "color overlay" with desired stroke color.
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2  
Hi there! We discourage link-only answers because if the link changes or goes down the answer becomes invalid. Can you add a little more detail to this one? –  Yisela Feb 13 at 3:53

You just have to set your stroke positon to "inner" for sharp edges.

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Can you please explain a little bit more what to do? –  Kurt yesterday

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