7
votes
2answers
257 views

Origin of numerical font weight descriptions in typography

The CSS specification (among several others) establish that, when selecting a font, the font-weight may be described using numerical descriptors ranging from 100 to 900 at 100 increments, where 400 is ...
5
votes
1answer
85 views

High-Resolution Operina Scans

I'm not sure if this is the right forum but there doesn't seem to be a dedicated typography forum. I'm looking for high-resolution scans from pages of Arrighi's La Operina, which is a classic manual ...
5
votes
1answer
295 views

What are some obscure/rare/endangered/extinct typographic symbols?

Just discovered the "asterism" today: ⁂ Super cool. I had never heard of it or seen it before. Wikipedia has more about it. What other typographic symbols are out there that were never all that ...
4
votes
3answers
398 views

What are the historical origins of Helvetica?

This issue of a typeface's heritage is of particular interest when attempting to pair faces. The nuances of related faces tend to harmonize well, whether that relation is grounded in history or the ...
4
votes
1answer
328 views

Blackletter fonts supporting long s and r rotunda?

I'm doing up a document in the style of the earliest printed documents. For this, I need to find a blackletter font that supports long s « ſ » and r rotunda « ꝛ ». Are there any such fonts out ...
8
votes
1answer
247 views

Can the end of double spacing after periods be dated?

From this Slate article: Hundreds of years ago some typesetters would end sentences with a double space, others would use a single space, and a few renegades would use three or four spaces. ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

How to add catchwords using InDesign

Many books before 1800 used a feature called catchwords, repeating the first word of the page at the bottom of the previous page. Wikipedia has a small article on them and there's a good question ...
15
votes
1answer
223 views

What's the term used when the first word of one page is repeated at the end of the previous page?

There's a common feature in old typography where the first word of a page is repeated at the end of the previous page, usually right-aligned on a line by itself. This book from 1759 shows this ...