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11

One way would be to apply a linear gradient on the stroke. Create a circle, and stroke it with a gradient pattern. Make sure the gradient has the stops like in the table and picture below. The gradient might not look as smooth in the transitions, but that's all that comes to mind. +------------+---------------+----------+ | Color Stop | RGB | ...


5

I assumed that would be a continuous path moving from one point to the next (as you mentioned stitching) but it looks like they are actually just a bunch of squares and triangles, rotated around a common center. In which case... Draw a sqaure: Use a transform effect (Effect → Distort & Transform → Transform... ) with a rotation and a number of ...


5

This is essentially how Illustrator draws in its default state. A few points that may help (or may not, it depends what you want to do): Use a consistent stroke weight throughout. Set your stroke caps and corners to round. Use geometric shapes. Set a meaningful grid and turn on "Snap to Grid" (View → Snap to Grid). Use bold solid colors and a ...


5

Under Preferences > Selection & Anchor Display, you can change the size of anchor points and direction handles. Choose the option all the way on the right.


5

Select multiple swatches in your swatch panel holding either Shift (if they're near each other) or Control/Command if they're not. Then on the top right drop down panel menu can click on Swatch Properties and click Global to set them all at once.


4

Yes. In photoshop from drop menu choose "save swatches for exchange", choose destination and name. Then in illustrator Open swatch library "other library" and point to *.ase file you created.


4

It's really easy. Calculate the distance between each icon, and the size of each one. Then go to the Artboard palette and add the amount of artboards according to the numbers of icons that you have. Reorganize the artboards through the menu: Object → Artboard → Rearrange. Specify the columns and the distance of each artboards to fit in every single icon.


4

I usually just create a rectangle with no fill and the heaviest stroke possible (1000pt). Then align the stroke to outside. Then I change the line colour to match the grey background. Set this as the top layer and you can easily toggle it on and off. Way easier than messing around with clipping masks.


4

One quite fast way is to use the scissors () tool. Click on your shape where you want the gaps and select the spans for deletion. Image 1: Quick timelapse of cut. A quick but less precision oriented way is to use the eraser tool instead of scissors. Its works best if you cut the path up first at some point to make it cut out stuff instead of carve into ...


4

I suggest following workflow: make a white thin lined stroke and start drawing polygons edges with line tool. Make sure you have smart guides on but no align guides. make a small area of polygon edges. select all and switch to live paint bucket tool hide edge color alt click in middle of polygon to pick color click in polygon to color it Once you have done ...


4

Those are called Video Rulers They can be turned on/off under View -> Rulers -> Video Rulers You can also turn on/off various settings for these rulers based on the artboard options. Go to Window -> Artboards Click on the dropdown to select Artboard Options... Under Display there are more options (checkboxes) for the video rulers like showing video ...


4

Pathfinder shape modes don't work well with open paths and completely ignore strokes. Since the actual path you're trying to subtract has 0 width, there is nothing for it to subtract. If you want to subtract the purple stroke you need to outline the stroke first. Simply select the stroked path and go to Object → Path → Outline Stroke. That will turn your ...


4

It sounds like you want to use an opacity mask (accessed through the Transparency panel). The masking object needs to be on a layer above the art it is masking. So, if you want to apply a Gaussian blur to the interior of some object, you would first make a copy of the object and paste in front (cmd-C, cmd-F). Convert the "copied" object to white fill and ...


4

You can try using an opacity mask. duplicate your image (keep original on bottom of stack) apply a blur effect to your duplicate image draw a shape, using white fill and no stroke select both the shape and the duplicate image (by clicking the selection bubbles on the right side of the layers panel) in Transparency panel, click Make Mask to move the mask, ...


4

The easiest way to achieve this is to use a clipping mask. That's essentially a shape that masks your text: everything inside the shape stays visible, everything outside of it is hidden. We'd like the shape of the mask to be that of, well, everything but a curved line. We can easily draw smooth curved lines with the Ellipse tool, but Illustrator can't use ...


4

Use the pen tool, it does what you want as long as you click the corner point and do not attempt to drag the segment. Line tool can not make a polyline just individual lines. Though, its also no problem to click drag multiple times and join the lines with shapebuilder or ctrl + j afterward. It may seem like a extra step but given you often need to compose ...


4

1) Open your PNG in Photoshop, not Illustrator 2) Double-click on your layer, to apply a style 3) Select Color Overlay 4) Choose your color and click OK


3

Go to : Edit>Preferences>General>Constrain Angle The angle there should be 0. Wish helps,


3

JPG images can not store any transparency or clip info at all. You need to review what are you doing. JPG, PNG, PDF are output formats, this is, formats that other aplications will recognize, but try to stay with the native's aplication file formats as much as you can, in this case use PSD, because all Adobe aplications will, not only recognize it, but take ...


3

Apparently the problem arose because I had commas in the data that I was importing. Illustrator read those as decimals for some reason. Originally, the data in my XML looked like this: <graph1> <data numDataColumns="9"> <values> <row> <value key="name"></value> &...


3

Assuming you've made the logo in illustrator you could simply copy your outer circle, place your new circle over the top of your image and create a clipping mask. In the menu "Object > Clipping Mask > Make" or "Command + 7" on a mac. Place your new clipped texture under your first circle and make sure your first circle doesn't have a fill.


3

Illustrator does not have a default shortcut for a specific Pathfinder function. Illustrator only has a shortcut to open the Pathfinder Window. A workaround would be to a create an action for the Pathfinder functions you use the most. Then apply a F-Key to the action. You can also repeat a Pathfinder function by pressing CMD/CTRL + 4


3

Use the Rectangular Grid Tool to create a grid. Create a mesh envelope (Object → Envelope Distort → Make with Mesh...) with an even and equal number of rows and columns. Select alternating columns of mesh anchor points using the Direct Selection Tool (A) and offset their position. Do the same with alternating rows of mesh points. Create a ...


3

To color in the individual triangles which seems to be your goal, then you can use the Live Paint Bucket (K) You can then Expand it to have your individual polygons


3

Blending modes work fundamentally different in CMYK vs RGB. This is basically down to the different ways that each color mode works and is why you see the difference. There is more in-depth discussion on the issue in this previous Q&A: Is CMYK mode not ideal for designs with blending mode? The reason it is always printing as you see it in CMYK is ...


3

The Eraser tool doesn't work like that. The best option is probably to use your circle as a clipping path. Select your circle and Copy (cmd+C). Select the background and Paste in Front (cmd+F). With the duplicate circle and the background image selected, hit cmd+7 (or go to Object > Clipping Mask > Make)


3

You can do this with a clipping mask in Illustrator: A clipping mask: Create a box over your image: Select both the box and the image and go to Object -> Clipping Mask -> Make: If the circles are vector I would merge the layer then use the pathfinder tool: Hightlight the circles: Pathfinder -> Unite: Create the box you want to cut ...


3

The shape you are trying to duplicate is difficult to draw. It is a mathematical function called a sine wave. I use a different version of Illustrator but the technique to draw one is the same or very similar. Things in Adobe programs migrate from menu to menu so I'll have to tell you what to do by name. Draw a line. Select it. Apply "Zig-Zag" effect. ...


3

You can apply any effect on a layer and it will affect all items in that layer as if they were one item. Doing this requires you to know a non-obvious thing about the layer panel. That is that things are selected with the round ball next to the object name (and if its filled its applying an effect) Image 1: Select the layer from round ball next to it. ...


3

This will only work if you are using the gradient as a stroke (as in your question). If you want to repeat the gradient endlessly (as opposed to a specific number of repeats) then you can skip steps 2 and 3 and use a pattern brush instead of an art brush. In CC you can now use images in brushes so you may be able to rasterize the gradient instead of ...



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