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9

Simply use any single color for the artwork. It doesn't have to be white in the file. You simply tell the printer to print the art white. This is, unless you are using some online printer..... then... Draw a black rectangle on a new layer. Move the layer below all other layers. Select the black rectangle and set it to non-printing using the Attributes ...


9

To make things easy for yourself when editing later, it pays off to do a bit more work upfront by using the Appearance panel for this. Draw a shape Give it any fill and no stroke Open the Appearance panel Select your shape with the Move tool (V) Choose Add New Stroke, either through Appearance panel options or with the icon bottom leftmost on the panel ...


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)


8

I found a quickish method! You had almost all of the workflow, and the 'cutout' part that you had, is what I was missing when trying at first. Starting with this image, because I couldn't find the one you're using: The longest part for me was masking out the background. You may also need to add a Black & White adjustment layer after step 2 if you're ...


7

Create the circle shape. Remove the fill. Give it a stroke that is as thick as the width you want. Go to Object → Expand.. in the top horizontal menu. Create a rectangle that's as thick as you want the gaps to be. While you still have the rectangle selected, hold Shift and select the circle. Use the alignment options to center it horizontally and ...


6

The first image looks like a direct Live Trace in Illustrator. In order to get better results you can boost the contrast of the image before live tracing it and after that as well. This is how the results look like: It's a good idea to clean some important curves and lines, so that they don't look so random.


6

You could create end caps by creating custom arrowheads. It's a bit of a detailed process, or actually editing the right file can be confusing. Here is an Adobe TV video on creating custom arrowheads in Illustrator CC. Then simply apply the arrowhead to the strokes via the Stroke Panel. You could also create brushes with end caps (pattern brush) but ...


6

If you want 1 shape from these two you can Expand them and Unite them via Pathfinder Second, you can just Group them - they will save the relations to each other Third, you can Make Compound Path from these shapes... Fourth, you can use Shape Builder tool to unite them via shift-click-drag


5

As far as I'm aware there is no correlation between position in Illustrator and position in Photoshop. If copying from AI, it always pastes to the center of the canvas in Photoshop. I may be mistaken though.


5

In Illustrator... Select it all, Pathfinder > Merge, click the red, hit delete. Or Select it all, grab the Shape Builder Tool, Hold down the Option/Alt and click-drag starting below the rings, to the center ring covered by red.


5

Most art will remain vector. Some things like multiple nested clipping paths are painful to do. See example 1 for just one thing that would be hard to do in Photoshop, not to mention how would you edit this in PS? Example 1: This is trivial to do and edit in illustrator but not so easy in PS. The biggest problem is that you need to come up with a ...


4

You can achieve this drawing the two external shapes and then creating a blend, from Object -> Blend -> Make and edit the steps with Object -> Blend -> Blend Options and specify the steps.


4

From the menu, choose Object > Transform > Shear or Right Mouse Button/Control-Click (Mac) and choose Transform > Shear. That Should do the trick. You could also go to the Transform Panel in the top right of your screen (Or Window > Transform), like you can see in the following screenshot:


4

I don't see why not. Just be careful that the sizes are proper when you export the file for print (something I'd use InDesign for, anyway). If all else fails, you could always just scale the finished work to the desired size.


4

I usually try to work in 1:1 scale, but rarely do I work with formats that large. It's not uncommon for artwork to be set at a smaller scale, though. Here's a question that touches on that: In Illustrator, how do I set my file at 10% scale? When going back and forth with a customer, I find it easier to communicate with exact sizes. I try and avoid language ...


4

It's the .png format that is the problem. .png is a raster format that will not upsize very well, just like any raster format. You need to save it in a vector format, such as: .ai - You'll most likely want to save everything to this format for your own safe keeping because it retains all editability unlike other formats. You would then save the same file ...


4

If you want extremely fast solution, grab Ellipse tool and select options as on the picture: If you want perfect solution you should use Pathfinder panel cutting the circle with a cross.


4

I give you another answer, but there are a lot of options. Create a circle (Elliple tool->Shift+Click+Drag) and make desired stroke (i.e. 23 points) Next, press Object->Expand Next grab Type tool and type "+", then press Object->expand and resize and locate the cross along the circle. Then select all the shapes and press Minus front on pathfinder ...


3

As they say on Facebook, "It's complicated." This has to do, somewhat, with one of the more esoteric (and mathematical) aspects of Postscript called a "Winding Rule," which determines what is the "inside" and what is the "outside" of a closed path segment, but mostly with the fact that any path has a direction. You determine the direction by dragging out ...


3

Your question looks theoretical but when reading more closely it sounds like you are asking how to merge shapes in Illustrator. There are multiple ways to make an hexagon with rounded points. Here is one that gives clean results but depending on the value you pick, might not look perfectly rounded : Draw an hexagon using the polygon tool. You can click on ...


3

workaround: use a transparent rectangle with the size of your artboard. not perfect but does the job


3

The Revert function in Illustrator takes you back to your last Save. If you saved over your working copy AND your back-up copy, then the only option is to find an older file that existed before you made the changes. If you do regular back-ups or use backup software, you'll have to go back to that. On the Mac if you have Time Machine running, you can go back ...


3

I am afraid you cannot affect the bleeding white areas, but instead of struggling with them, make your shape larger then needed and hide the white areas by clipping mask. Additionally, you can hide the upper border just by moving the Glass layer below the wavy one or using the waves as a mask.


3

It can help to bring out the details of a subtle texture by altering the levels of the original image. I used Photoshop to do this: This shows us that the cloud has a very slight gradient applied to it as well as an inner glow. Both of these can be added as an effect in Illustrator. The opacity of the cloud is also slightly reduced which might add that ...


3

Use variables within Illustrator. Variables are designed so that you create a basic layout and designate what text is to be changed with each instance. You then link to an external document containing that list of items to use in the steps, in your case the CSV file. Here's a link to the Adobe Help Files explaining the use of variables within Illustrator: ...


3

In this instance, I'd redraw it by hand. They are basic simple shapes and the aspects you may be trying to preserve, such as the gradient, bevel, drop shadow, will not translate well to tracing. Redrawing the shapes, adding a gradient fill and a gradient stroke (to simulate the bevel and emboss effect), then duplicating to create the solid drop shadow ...


3

Try the "Preserve exact dash and gap lengths" option in the Stroke Panel. It's the left-most of a pair of illustrated buttons, just to the right of the "Dashed Line" checkbox.


3

Select the art and choose Edit > Edit Colors > Recolor Artwork and play to your heart's content. To hide the selection edges, simply choose View > Hide Edges. However, if you use Recolor Artwork the edges automatically get hidden when that dialog is open.


3

If you plan ahead you can.... Select > Object > Text Objects Object > Lock > Selection Click-drag to select what is not locked When done, Object > Unlock All to access the text objects again. You might also find it helpful to save a selection (Select > Save Selection) this will allow you to quickly re-select something.



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