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70

As Wrzlprmft has already pointed out, over 50% of your SVG file's size is taken up by an embedded PNG bitmap image used to create a fairly subtle shading effect on the controller. Just getting rid of that image, and replacing it with a simple radial gradient, is enough to shrink the SVG down to about 10kb.               ...


34

Your SVG contains an embedded pixel graphic for the shade in the bottom right of the controller. This is responsible for about ⅔ of the file size. If you remove it, your SVG file is en par with your JPEG. You can probably achieve an adequately similar effect with a gradient. Other techniques of reducing SVG file size include: Remove all Metadata and ...


31

This is an optical illusion. The weight of the lower text is pulling your eyes even when not focusing on it. Its a concept called "optical center," which is well documented. The mathematical center will never look properly centered. This is where knowing software isn't the same as knowing design. here's a quick demo. this article covers it pretty ...


27

Type your fonts (in this case I guess and you suggest Times New Roman) and outline it. Drag it into Brushes. Choose Art Brush and use the default settings. Create a circle, and while choosing it, click on the newly created brush. Choose appropriate stroke to scale the fonts' height. Rotate it a little bit to match your original logo. Now it ...


26

I am a little surprised no-one has mentioned the "Scour" extension. It's bundled with Inkscape (as of v0.47), and does many of the optimisations mentioned by Ilmari Karonen.


17

In Illustrator, you can use a Mesh Envelope distort to non-destructively warp text like this: Select your text object, then use Object > Envelope Distort > Make With Mesh... and add however many rows and columns you need to get the desired effect. I used 16 rows and 1 column in my example.


15

Use the Polar Grid Tool. This is what it's for. Tap the ↑ arrow on the keyboard while dragging to add rings. Tap the ↓ arrow while dragging to remove rings. Tap → or ← arrows to remove or add dividing lines.


13

By making the right leg of the A vertical the connection to the T can be cleaned up. This also helps to balance the logo, making the initial A more prominent (as prominent as the final C). In the logo below this is further reinforced by making the A a bit bolder than in your original logo.


11

There are a couple of problems: The sides of the A strokes need to be straight and parallel, to match the parallel edges of the other letters. The counters beneath the arms of T are very unbalanced. You can't do much about the spacing around the capital I (because C is curved), but they are better balanced. The C might still be moved left slightly, ...


11

After some fiddling around here's way that might be quicker than copying/pasting/moving. Create your popup. On a separate layer or file, create a black square that is the same size as the popup. Select it and define a new brush (Edit > Define Brush Preset). You can then discard the black square. Make your canvas fit the final size of the artwork you wish ...


11

Why use an inferior product when you already have MS Paint installed? In Paint, use the Select tool and select the area you wish to "drag" around. Hold Shift and hold down the left mouse button as you drag the selection around, producing the desired effect.


11

Look at the images - you choose the same options and get the result - You select the path and invoke GRADIENT panel where you choose between 3 STROKE options according to the desired effect: or or


11

This is a very, very broad question and should probably be closed as too broad (I voted so). There are a ton of things Illustrator does which Photoshop does not. Just as there are a ton of things Photoshop does which Illustrator does not. In addition, there may be common areas where Illustrator is much better than Photoshop even though features are ...


10

If you require lots of segments, it might be easiest for you to use Illustrator's graph tool. This is essentially just a hollowed out pie chart, so you can place an elipse over a chart to create your graphic.


10

You switched into wireframe (outline) mode. It is quite useful sometime. You can switch between them via Ctrl(Cmd)+Y.


10

To make things easy for yourself when editing later, it pays off to do a bit more work upfront by using the Appearance panel for this. Draw a shape Give it any fill and no stroke Open the Appearance panel Select your shape with the Move tool (V) Choose Add New Stroke, either through Appearance panel options or with the icon bottom leftmost on the panel ...


10

It is not that hard. And here is how you can make it: 1. Create a desired size rectangle, add a line across it and align them properly to center. Then copy-rotate the line by 10 degrees (or 6, 360 needs to be divisible without remainder). 2. Then select all objects and click on the Divide tool on the Pathfinder Panel. 3. Now easily select every secont ...


9

Simply use any single color for the artwork. It doesn't have to be white in the file. You simply tell the printer to print the art white. This is, unless you are using some online printer..... then... Draw a black rectangle on a new layer. Move the layer below all other layers. Select the black rectangle and set it to non-printing using the Attributes ...


9

First create an equilateral triangle. To do so use the Polygon Tool and bring the number of edges down to 3 using the keyboard arrows. Tap the down arrow to reduce the number of sides. Make sure you hold the Shift key down as you drag with the tool. This ensures the triangle is straight. Then create your circle and align the center of the circle with ...


9

You can "tweak" the artboard color by this way: Select File->Document Setup... On the popup window you will have Transparency sub-menu: Choose the upper color (I set it to rose) and Mark "Simulate Colored Paper" - You will get this image - There is no any other layers except of text ones...


9

Preview is simply a terrible PDF viewer. It has many rendering issues with PDFs. Preview is designed by Apple to view PDFs for average home end-users. It is not designed to be a professional PDF viewer. Apple simply appears to not be concerned with many rendering issues in Preview where PDFs are concerned. What you are describing I'd actually call one of ...


9

This is what I find to be an acceptable solution. First, create a gradient mesh to a box as follows. Second, drag every other box to a suitable location. Third, rotate each box to a suitable angle. Fourth, drag each vertex to a suitable location. Fifth, pick up color for each vertex from the original figure. Sixth, use the original figure to ...


9

It would seem to me that this is a fairly easy thing to pull off with gradients rather than raster effects. It is just a matter of positioning gradients at the proper angles for some sections.


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)


8

I found a quickish method! You had almost all of the workflow, and the 'cutout' part that you had, is what I was missing when trying at first. Starting with this image, because I couldn't find the one you're using: The longest part for me was masking out the background. You may also need to add a Black & White adjustment layer after step 2 if you're ...


8

From an architectural standpoint try to think of these not as triangles but as surfaces. Surfaces are made up of sides. In this case these just happen to be, mostly though not entirely, triangles. Use the line tool, not the polygon tool. For a quick example here's a rough animation:


8

Draw a rectangle that covers the whole canvas. Make sure you have "Smart Guides" activated (View->Smart Guides or Ctrl+U) Draw a bunch of black (or any other colour) lines creating your design. The lines can intersect (encouraged) but make sure they touch each other or they touch the border of the rectangle (i.e. the border of the canvas). This is why ...


8

There's no simple way that I know of. You can, however, create a rectangle of the same dimensions as the artboard, change its colour to one that works better, move it to the back (Command/Control+Shift+[) - or even to a lower layer - and lock it. It's not a perfect solution, I know, but it works for me.


8

Related, if not duplicate: Different color strokes in Illustrator (the gummi worms) Easiest way for me is just with a gradient on the stroke... set the middle stops to be in the same location. Benefits of this method is you simply change the gradient to move the sections. There's no need to reconfigure a brush or cut out new shapes if you need different ...



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