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70

As Wrzlprmft has already pointed out, over 50% of your SVG file's size is taken up by an embedded PNG bitmap image used to create a fairly subtle shading effect on the controller. Just getting rid of that image, and replacing it with a simple radial gradient, is enough to shrink the SVG down to about 10kb.               ...


34

Your SVG contains an embedded pixel graphic for the shade in the bottom right of the controller. This is responsible for about ⅔ of the file size. If you remove it, your SVG file is en par with your JPEG. You can probably achieve an adequately similar effect with a gradient. Other techniques of reducing SVG file size include: Remove all Metadata and ...


32

This is an optical illusion. The weight of the lower text is pulling your eyes even when not focusing on it. Its a concept called "optical center," which is well documented. The mathematical center will never look properly centered. This is where knowing software isn't the same as knowing design. here's a quick demo. this article covers it pretty ...


27

Type your fonts (in this case I guess and you suggest Times New Roman) and outline it. Drag it into Brushes. Choose Art Brush and use the default settings. Create a circle, and while choosing it, click on the newly created brush. Choose appropriate stroke to scale the fonts' height. Rotate it a little bit to match your original logo. Now it ...


26

I am a little surprised no-one has mentioned the "Scour" extension. It's bundled with Inkscape (as of v0.47), and does many of the optimisations mentioned by Ilmari Karonen.


20

This is another method to do the job using illustrator Create a circle and select it go to Object>Pattern>Make adjust the spacing between circles in the pattern options panel and press Done Draw a rectangle and fill it with the pattern that we have just made; you may need to scale the pattern a little by choosing effects>distort & ...


17

In Illustrator, you can use a Mesh Envelope distort to non-destructively warp text like this: Select your text object, then use Object > Envelope Distort > Make With Mesh... and add however many rows and columns you need to get the desired effect. I used 16 rows and 1 column in my example.


17

Here is an overview on how I would do it with Inkscape, which should be easily translatable to Illustrator (if not, Inkscape is free). I won’t go into the details, as it is not your desired program. Create something like this: The rectangles on the left are squares with a border length corresponding to the border length of your cube. Group the top ...


16

It's not an easy task if you are seeking to be precise. Illustrator won't do this easily. You'd have to manually draw the overall shapes and adjust perspective, size, and value for each element. A mesh in Illustrator fails because it's very difficult to get hard edge conversion areas, in addition, meshes distort the underlying objects based on position of ...


12

You can actually do this in Illustrator (as per request). The trick is to make sure that once you use mesh tool you drag the along handles back to 1/3 of the way along the edge otherwise it squeezes the image along*. In addition it can help to keep rotating the are back and forth, for easier selection. Image 1: doing the scruple. What i actually do is ...


12

hsawires' answer with envelope distort > make with mesh is the best answer, but there are some additional tricks you can use that make it easier to get the "the perspective effect in sharp folds" described (also, four very good answers clearly isn't enough :-D): Prepare your dots, any way you like... the great thing about Envelope Distort is, you can apply ...


11

After some fiddling around here's way that might be quicker than copying/pasting/moving. Create your popup. On a separate layer or file, create a black square that is the same size as the popup. Select it and define a new brush (Edit > Define Brush Preset). You can then discard the black square. Make your canvas fit the final size of the artwork you wish ...


11

Why use an inferior product when you already have MS Paint installed? In Paint, use the Select tool and select the area you wish to "drag" around. Hold Shift and hold down the left mouse button as you drag the selection around, producing the desired effect.


11

Look at the images - you choose the same options and get the result - You select the path and invoke GRADIENT panel where you choose between 3 STROKE options according to the desired effect: or or


11

This is a very, very broad question and should probably be closed as too broad (I voted so). There are a ton of things Illustrator does which Photoshop does not. Just as there are a ton of things Photoshop does which Illustrator does not. In addition, there may be common areas where Illustrator is much better than Photoshop even though features are ...


11

As an alternative to @Scott's answer you could use Puppet Warp in Photoshop (Edit → Puppet Warp). If you try this, I would suggest a selecting Mode:Rigid and Density:Fewer Points in the options at the top in order to make the surface less pliable, like in your example. Just add pins and move them around until you achieve the desired displacement. ...


10

To make things easy for yourself when editing later, it pays off to do a bit more work upfront by using the Appearance panel for this. Draw a shape Give it any fill and no stroke Open the Appearance panel Select your shape with the Move tool (V) Choose Add New Stroke, either through Appearance panel options or with the icon bottom leftmost on the panel ...


10

As KMSTR says, you don't. Impact does not have an italic variant, nor a bold, for that matter. Many consumer-based software like Microsoft Office allow so-called faux bold and italic for all fonts installed: if a separate font file for these alternate styles is not installed, the software simply slants the characters (for faux italic) or makes them thicker ...


10

It is not that hard. And here is how you can make it: 1. Create a desired size rectangle, add a line across it and align them properly to center. Then copy-rotate the line by 10 degrees (or 6, 360 needs to be divisible without remainder). 2. Then select all objects and click on the Divide tool on the Pathfinder Panel. 3. Now easily select every secont ...


9

You could create end caps by creating custom arrowheads. It's a bit of a detailed process, or actually editing the right file can be confusing. Here is an Adobe TV video on creating custom arrowheads in Illustrator CC. Then simply apply the arrowhead to the strokes via the Stroke Panel. You could also create brushes with end caps (pattern brush) but ...


9

Simply use any single color for the artwork. It doesn't have to be white in the file. You simply tell the printer to print the art white. This is, unless you are using some online printer..... then... Draw a black rectangle on a new layer. Move the layer below all other layers. Select the black rectangle and set it to non-printing using the Attributes ...


9

These hairlines are due to flattening, anti-aliasing, and overprinting. Essentially they show the seams between where transparency has been flattened to preserve appearance. If you zoom in or out you will most likely see the lines disappear or appear in other areas, but will never increase in size. As a print proof it's most likely that the PDF is in ...


9

Preview is simply a terrible PDF viewer. It has many rendering issues with PDFs. Preview is designed by Apple to view PDFs for average home end-users. It is not designed to be a professional PDF viewer. Apple simply appears to not be concerned with many rendering issues in Preview where PDFs are concerned. What you are describing I'd actually call one of ...


9

Like plainclothes said ... an easy screenshot-walkthrough for an even number of segments: Draw a circle Add a line across Rotate line/path with (TRICK!) the copy button N-times. Repeat action (Command-D on OS X). Select circle and all sections. Use the pathfinder tool and select divide. You got segments.


9

This is what I find to be an acceptable solution. First, create a gradient mesh to a box as follows. Second, drag every other box to a suitable location. Third, rotate each box to a suitable angle. Fourth, drag each vertex to a suitable location. Fifth, pick up color for each vertex from the original figure. Sixth, use the original figure to ...


9

It would seem to me that this is a fairly easy thing to pull off with gradients rather than raster effects. It is just a matter of positioning gradients at the proper angles for some sections.


9

Much of this is determined by the font file itself. Some fonts have extra leading built in which can cause odd vertical alignments. If you find you've got a font with the odd leading, you can select the text and apply Effect > Path > Outline Object. Then in the Preferences ensure Use Preview Bounds is checked and vertically align things. This will use ...


9

See ya If you've been paid for the scope of work completed, walk away. If you haven't, you might want want to walk away anyway. You're not likely to get to the bottom of the file issue without investing a lot of time. She doesn't know how to use Illustrator -- she just downloaded it! It sounds to me like you're not likely to get paid for the time it will ...


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)



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