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3

I'm not sure what your first question is asking, exactly, but as for your second: In InDesign, you can use the "spreads" option in the Print > General dialog to print your pages as spreads. Then, under Print > Setup, choose "Scale to Fit", so that it shrinks the two-page spread to fit your 8.5x11 paper. Good luck!


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With the white arrow – the direct selection tool – you can select the bottom vertexes of your rectangle; but that won't do you any good. The border of a frame in InDesign is applied to the entire frame, not on a per-selection basis (just like in Illustrator). Some other options: Put your text inside a one-cell table. Each of a cell's borders can have a ...


3

Effective PPI needs to be 1.5 times the line screen (LPI) being used when printed. In most cases a 150-175 line screen is used in offset printing. This means the effective PPI of an image should be roughly 225-265ppi. 175x1.5 = 262.5 150x1.5 = 225 It's not unheard of to use a more dense line screen though. If your print provider uses a 300LPI screen ...


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Overprint Preview is on. CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+Y to turn it off or it's the first item in the View toolbar.


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I don't know for sure if there's a way to export a PDF from Numbers without keep all document information (background included)... My guess is that there is not. However, if you just need the numerical data from the Numbers doc, why not save it as an .xlsx file? You definitely CAN import that doc type into InDesign, the same way you'd import/place a photo ...


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Info of InDesign's transparency effects are here: Transparency: Working with Effects in Adobe InDesign CS6 And there's a bit of a walk-through here: InDesign Help / Adding transparency effects To simulate the shading down the inner margins of the page, you could draw a rectangular frame from the top to the bottom of your page, and position it so it sits ...


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ON *nix systems there is a command called psbook (see instructions here) and psnup so you can probably find it for osX. For windows you can get it with cygwin. what you would do is call: psbook -s16 print.ps out.ps psnup -la4 -2 out.ps > out2up.ps This will make pages with 16 page long signatures or 4 paper groups. You can change this by editing the -s ...


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Choose Type > Show Hidden Characters to see if tabs are used. Relevant InDesign Help Article: View hidden nonprinting characters If it's not a table the lines propably are Paragraph Rules. Relevant InDesign Help Article: Add rules (lines) above or below paragraphs


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This is known as the 'dreaded white-box' problem. It was fairly common about 10 years ago (less so now) and has to do with transparency issues when the artwork is flattened. Adobe have a fairly comprehensive trouble-shooting page about it here: https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-suite/kb/white-box-or-color-wash.html


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Select the text frame with the Selection Tool and Copy it. Draw a rectangular picture frame Edit > Paste Into Set the picture frame to the margin width. Or the way many may do it... draw white rectangles to cover things. A method I try and avoid.


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Pre-press departments customarily use single PDF pages and arrange spreads in imposition applications like Preps. InDesign isn't really intended to be an end-production tool. It's a front-construction tool. I'm afraid manually configuring the full spread is about all I could think to do with InDesign. It should be noted, if you are getting this ...


1

It is possible. However, this is a more complex issue than it may seem. When paper folds it creates bulk. The more bulk the more you have to compensate for it. The amount of compensation would be in direct proportion the weight of stock you print on. Some A5 panels would need to be smaller than A5 and some larger so that when things folded, the piece would ...


1

Per papersizes your A0 and A5 are not a perfect fit so you will need to trim a little below the A0 to make it work: You should take the guides and mark where you want your A5. I would consult with your printer and your client how you want the design to unfold because that would determine how the document is setup in InDesign. Ideally you could set up a ...


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The fastest solution for this would be the SWF export option from InDesign. But maybe you don't want to use flash with modern web devices in mind. There are other solutions like issuu.com.


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In the pages panel, select the cover page thumbnail. Right-click it and select "Numbering & Section Options" In the Numbering & Section Options dialog, change the Page Numbering style to something like A, B, C or i, ii, iii and click OK. This will number the entire document in this style, and that's OK. Next, select the thumbnail for the page you ...


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If you're using windows, increase font size to 125% or more in Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Display. Log off and log in again. InDesign's interface will have large fonts.


1

The offset setting determines where all of the other printer's marks will be placed, in relation to the bleed marks. Setting the offset to the same value as your bleed will ensure that the printer's marks are not placed anywhere inside of the bleed. This not only looks better but is a better option, because it keeps the bleed clean, in my opinion. Zero ...


1

InDesign has the ability to adjust content from the left margin set to the right margin set and vice versa as you add new pages, provided you have both a left and right master and each is set with respectively mirrored margins. Unfortunately, InDesign can't mirror the rotation angles of your frames, using master pages to accomplish this task is not going to ...


1

The rule of thumb I've always been told to use by just about everyone is 300 pixels per inch. This ensures a sharp image in the average print job. You have some leeway, though. For lower-quality print (like newspapers), 200 or even 150 dpi might be enough. Also, in regular print, if you use an image as a background, you don't need super-sharp quality and ...


1

Here's the best and fastest way to know what resources are the biggest. You cannot "search" for a resource based on the link's size, but this is as close as I can get you to help you do what you want. 1 - Export your project as a package. 2 - Click on "Package" 3 - Click on "Package" again making sure these boxes are ticked: 4 - Open the "Links" ...


1

I feel your pain — I recently had the same dilemma — after several frustrating hours and a lot of web searching I settled on this solution: use a paragraph style with 2 nested character styles Example explanation {you can use your own choice of "paragraph" & 'character' style names - these are the ones I used): "Drop Cap Quote2" (paragraph style) drop ...


1

I think it's a matter of personal choice when a relatively inexperienced user goes thorough the selection thing. When I had first started designing, I did everything in Adobe Photoshop and I was happy with the result. I did everything from print media to web interfaces and there wasn't a single complaint from clients' side. It was only when I came to know ...


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In cases like these, it's wise to create several layers and arrange the master page items oon those layers. By default, a master page item is on the very bottom of its respective layer. So, if you have, for example, three layers, named 'top', 'middle' and 'bottom', you should put your blue bar master page item on the 'top' layer and have your (regular) ...


1

F4V is not a supported video format in InDesign. You can work with the following movie formats: AVI MPEG SWF Quicktime (Version 6.0 or above required) Also, be sure you embed the video into the PDF.


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Here is a little script that does, what you want to do: #target InDesign if(!(app.selection.length == 1 && app.selection[0] instanceof TextFrame && app.selection[0].overflows)){ alert("Error\rSelect exactly one text frame with overset text and try again."); exit(); }; var tf = app.selection[0]; var increment = 1; var ...


1

I see two solutions: 1) Generate your full-book TOC and copy-paste your text in chunks as needed. (I think this is the faster way.) 2) Create a set of otherwise identical styles for each chapter. So you have your Chapter Headers style, and then duplicate it multiple times to create CH1, CH2, CH3, etc. A lot more moving parts depending on how many chapters ...


1

Object → Text Frame Options → Auto-Size (tab) → Auto-Sizing = Height Only (or both) This solves your issue. If you want hide a part of the text, just put it into a frame (Paste Into). This frame became a mask for a text box. You can setup such behavior for any new text box as default. This can be done from 'Objects Styles' panel.


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My solution using Acrobat only (as it is mentioned in your tags). open your border PDF in Acrobat go to pages > watermark > Add Watermark select file and choose your second PDF text file adjust the scale and the position as you wish and press Ok. save the result to a new PDF


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Set up a Cell Style with the options you want, if you don't already have one created.... Then Double click the default [Basic Table] Style in that panel. Set the appropriate rows to use your Cell Style: Then when you import the Excel table, be certain to check the Import Options item and set the import to use the Basic Table style. Caveat: In many ...


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As far as I remember, InDesign does not produce a proper PDF with active elements; it involves (yuck!) Flash. A radical but reliable way would be to not include the active elements in InDesign, but add them in Acrobat. There you might add Checkboxes. To create a set of mutually exclusive checkboxes (behaving like radiobuttons, but allow to be unchecked), ...



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