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7

There are roughly four options. Here are three I wouldn't recommend: Bundle the InDesign file with File > Package, as discussed by Vincent ("Generally a Bad Idea™." to let a client loose with InDesign) Get them a copy of Adobe InCopy, which is designed for this purpose (editing text in InDesign files). However, it costs money, and while I've not used it ...


6

While making a book it's extremely important to use baseline grid because Pages are thin and transparent and you don't want line to show from the page before, and baseline grid avoids this from happening 2 pages side to side that the lines are not aligned to each other is unaesthetic to the point of almost unreadable Here's how you work with baseline ...


5

Generally, sending an InDesign file to a non-designer is a Bad Idea™. InDesign has quite a steep learning curve for one, and project managers are prone to edit more things than you ask them when you send them source files. On top of that, sending a native (source) file to a customer is not a very good move as a designer, for it contains lots of ...


5

When setting up a long document in inDesign, there are a few best principles to follow that will make your experience much smoother and enjoyable. A) Use master templates. This is crucial, create a master template for every page type that you will be using in your book. A classic standard is a blank template without page numbers for end pages, chapter ...


4

If all the labels are consistent in appearance and the only changes that will be needed is text on the label -- I'd use PDF forms. It is a simple matter to create a PDF form which allows any user to input form field data (text) in specific areas. Using a PDF form ensures a few things: Editing is easy on the end user. They click and type, then save or ...


1

I do option A. I keep one file with the whole image. Then, I open that file in Photoshop, save it with "CUT" in the file name as a .PSD. I draw a clipping path using the pen tool around the whole object, or just part if I know exactly where I want it to stick out. I save the path, select it and create a layer mask. I place the original image in my InDesign ...


1

It is essentially A. You place the photo, determine the position of desired crop, then edit the photo in Photoshop so it is cropped where desired. For print production, and using InDesign+Photoshop, the image would just be saved with transparency as .psd files and placed into InDesign. On occasion, using 2 versions of the same photo can come in handy. ...


1

If I would be asked to do it, I would go for the solution A you mentioned. It's not a problem to make some adjustments in the psd file. About the standard file format I think there is not one for all, every format has its pro and cons sometimes you choose one other times another as needed.


1

InDesign native Datamerge won't allow you to create hyperlinks on the fly. You need at least Scripting to achieve that. A plugin such as EasyCatalog is also a good candidate.


1

All of these answers seem very legitimate and probably above my skill level, so I may offer more basic feedback. First, let's ask some important questions to narrow it down: Does your project manager have InDesign, and is he comfortable working with it/editing files? If so, we can go from there. If not, there's no reason to waste your time. Figure out ...


1

If you are exporting the pdf from InDesign, you can do it when you export. First, open your .indd file in InDesign. Go to the file menu and select export. Once you have selected where you want your pdf to be saved, a dialog box entitled Export Adobe PDF should open. On the left hand side, there is a series of menus. Under Output, you can select Color ...



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