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2

I was at an InDesign User's Group meeting last night at a local university, and this question came up. Apparently there isn't a way to increase the GUI icon sizes (at least according to the experts presenting last night). If enough of us complain to Adobe, maybe they'll change that in the future?


2

No. The only way to make the user Interface larger is to reduce the resolution of your monitor or get a larger monitor. Although at times I think about investing in these...


0

I believe that's the way it's supposed to work. The page area in InDesign is your finished product - bleed and slug areas extend beyond that.


6

Bleed and slugs are meant to be cut off after printing. Therefore you don't want them on the page. By being outside the InDesign page definition, it should make it clear that when printed, only the actual page will be seen. When you export to a press-ready PDF or output the InDesign file with printer's marks, the additional areas for bleed and slug are ...


0

You're designing for print, so judging the typography from a screen is a completely different beast. As stated above, print outs will aid your design. Personally I'd print 10-20 of the same page, and adjust the typography in each. Leading, spacing, type size, until you get one that is perfect for you. What you believe to look good on screen could be type ...


-2

I recommend the text size 15 and the title size 60. It works well in my experience of making a magazine.


1

I just found that I could "modify links of all occurrences of (XYZ file)" and replace it with my new image. I tested it a bit and it seems like it respects the size and ratio of each image frame so replacing the "parent" image link sounds like it works just fine in most cases. Here's a screenshot of my link panel (sorry it's in french) Make sure you ...


0

What I ended up doing was first printing the front side, tiled. Then I re-loaded those prints back into the printer and printed the back side, tiled. The tricky part was figuring out the right order to reload those front-side prints. Just reloading the prints in the same order did not work. I had to essentially pull my even pages out and put them ahead of ...


1

Your section start will define the "1" of the "1 of X." You use the placeholder marker to give you the "1." The "X" itself is generated by a text variable: InDesign CS5: Placeholder for "number of pages in a document"? If you go to Type > Text variables > Insert variable, you will find "Last page Number." This gives you the last page ...


4

In illustrator do this (see footnotes for InDesign changes): Draw a line with the line tool Select the line and right click on it and choose Transform → Move... In the vertical slot type how much you ant each line separated. Then hit Copy. Hit ctrl + D† to make a third line (with equal spacing). Color the strokes and apply dashing in the ...


4

Simply put the computer has no idea how big your screen is. 100% zoom does not really mean anything meaningful*. You can tell the computer how big your monitor actually is but this is a bit unreliable and has some side effects in other software. So simply the computer is showing how big the relative ruler is. There is also no guarantee that the printer is ...


0

I've been faced with the same issue. I had too many items to replace (hundreds) so instead of resetting the master on each page, I added guides (by dragging from the ruler) on the master page to mark the centre point of my text areas. Then, on each problem page I dragged the overridden text area to the correct position (which snaps into place..)


1

It may be that there is a column or page break character at the end of the text on page 147 that you provided. A quick way to check is to select the menu TYPE > SHOW HIDDEN CHARACTERS. This will show all of your spaces, hard and soft returns, and break characters.


0

I think I figured it out. Should have been using positive lookahead, not lookbehind. .+(?=,\s\d{4}). This article was helpful carijansen.com/2013/03/03/positive-lookahead-grep-for-designers


1

Some things to try: Is there an item with text wrap on the page? Do you have some kind of "Keep with Next" setting checked? If you copy this text to a brand new document, does it do the same thing? (Then you have a Page Return character somewhere.) If all else fails, copy this chunk of text to a text file (NOT Word or the like) to strip out formatting, ...


0

One solution I was thinking of is by using one master instead of two (don't forget that you can still set up page guides differently for each page in each master) In the master, first image below, create a text box that will span on both pages. Now you can write A - (Page Number Marker) then press Shift-Tab to create a right indent tab to shift the cursor ...


0

Does selecting all of the images and pressing ctrl+alt+shift+C (cmd+opt+shift+c) do the trick? That command will fill the frame, locking the original image proportions. At that point, the extra image will extend (hidden) outside the frame. To remedy that, ctrl+alt+c (cmd+opt+c) will extend the frame to the image's full size.


4

You cannot. "Use Typographers' Quotes" is a system-wide setting, not applicable to separate paragraph or character styles. And InDesign does not 'know' what code is and what is not, so it changes typed straight quotes to curly ones when the setting is on and not when it's off. That said: where does your text come from? If typing in InDesign: the Typo ...


1

This can be done in a very exact way using the Transform panel: Open the Transform panel (Window > Transform or Shift+F8); Lay out your two lines of text in the same font size and ensure that they align at their left side; Select the top line and read out its width (W) in the Transform Panel. Copy that value or write it down; Select the bottom line; Mark ...


0

I am experiencing this exact problem right now! If it is true Adobe hasn't found a way of exporting nice circular edged graphics from InDesign, I am pretty dissapointed... I have found a workaround that's worked for me though: I have to use these PNGs in InDesign coz they're external graphics I've received, and would be too time-consuming to try recreate ...


1

Darn. This ALMOST fixed my problem. But, in my case, I wanted to export the images with the same name as the originals (we rename with serial numbers for the merchandise images). They were exported with their original filenames (plus a suffix, but easy to deal with using a batch renamer). HOWEVER, The quality is considerably lower than just exporting as ...


2

Set up Character Styles or Paragraph Styles to handle this. Then when you need to update the font/size/leading/spacing/etc., go to the appropriate Character or Paragraph style and make the changes. Everything in your document using that Character or Paragraph Style will then be updated with your changes (assuming you're not overriding them locally - i.e. ...


1

if I understood you correctly then it is simple. All you need to do is create a text box that will hold the page number in you master page, it should have the static text written first "A-" for example and then the Current Page Number Marker. Let me know if you need further clarifications!


0

No automatic way that I can think of, but you could still technically accomplish this by "assembling" it digitally before printing to paper. This may be more work than assembling them separately physically though. If you really wanted to go for it though... First, I'd print both the front and back separately as tiled, but instead of sending to the printer ...


1

Well, 2 diferent questions here. 1) You need to configure your export settings of the pdf. The pdf for printing probably has the images in 300 dpi, cmyk, and with zip compression or no compression at all. So you need to configure the export settings to rgb, jpg compression, and lets say 100 dpi on the images. The fonts must be embeded in the file, and ...


0

Apparently, you are in preview mode in InDesign. Although that's a nice mode to see what your work is going to look like when actually printed, it's sub-optimal for actual work. Try hitting W to switch back the regular viewing mode. This will allow you to see the pasteboard and the bleed area, and it will most probably also pop up some useful guides and ...


2

I'd have deleted preferences as a first step, which tends to solve most InDesign weirdnesses. Uninstalled/reinstalled next. The underlying problem (besides your colleague's tenacious adherence to the old Quark way of doing things) is that the install was somehow set to Arabic. You will have already set the language option in InDesign's [Basic Paragraph] ...


4

Object > Unlock All On Spread or ⌥+⌘+L for Mac or Ctrl+Alt+L on Windows (not tested, but should work) That unlocks every item on the page; including your object.


0

I agree with both previous responses and would add that it's always best to decide upon the appropriate application for the type of job you're doing - in this case, that would be Indesign as it is specifically a layout tool. Thus it's best configured to do all the things you want to do to unite the various elements - text and images - into your 250-page ...


2

Scott's correct, in that there is no need to convert the .ai files to any other format before placing in InDesign, but I would highly recommend foregoing Illustrator completely and building your image-heavy pages directly in the .indd. Assembly and simple compositing of the kind you can do in Illustrator are much faster (on the order of two to three times ...


2

That border defines the InDesign page, and it's not configurable. When using InDesign to design web pages, though, you can use this to your advantage by defining a document size that represents a browser window rather than just the web page. Drag out or create (Layout > Create Guides) guides to define your page within that larger document page and build ...


2

Just save Illustrator files as .ai and place the .ai files into InDesign. No need for other formats.


0

As you've discovered, Section Markers have to be defined manually for each section. If you have a fairly long document, you can divide it into chapters, one document per chapter, and tie them all together using the book panel. InDesign does automatically number chapters, and you can include the chapter number in a running head on the master pages. You have ...


1

Those specific ornaments are part of Bickham Script Pro, which either came with your copy of InDesign (if you have a perpetual license version) or can be installed from Typekit (if you're on Creative Cloud). Many OpenType typefaces include ornaments. To find them, use the Glyphs panel (Type > Glyphs) and use the dropdown selector to view "Ornaments" and ...


3

I'd hazard a guess that in 99.5% of uses such as this those flourishes are not drawn or created. Rather they are decorative glyphs found in any number of fonts. Here's one such font: http://www.myfonts.com/search/fleurons/fonts/ Simply pick the glyph you want and set it like you would any type character. If you really want to draw your own, it simply ...


0

Not very elegant, but could you physically move the folder containing the linked elements, open the ID file so it recognizes that everything is missing -- and then relink imports to the new location?


0

It appears that I misunderstood the concept of "sections" in InDesign. Sections don't have numbers. They are a high-level abstract way of dividing a document into... well, sections. Moreover, there is no relationship between sections and numbered styles which is what I really want to control. OK, my final answer. I ended up using section markers as ...


0

I had to go download the 960 templates to see this.... This question is very specific to those files. It's just a layer with pink boxes on it to indicate the columns. The pink boxes are applied to a master page, then that master page is associated with the locked layer. Look at the master pages you'll find the boxes.


0

Those are called the columns, have you tried reading 960.gs to learn more about it? Here is a demo. You can even view slides. Your design is based on those columns and there are different options and columns such as 12 column, 24 column, etc. etc. A good read about it is over at code tuts called Mastering the 960 Grid System that explains how to use ...


2

I see a few choices: If you align the top of the headline and the top of the text, yes, short headlines will have white space under them. Cope. Bottom-align the headlines, so the white space is above the headline, which might look more attractive depending on the rest of your layout. Create a consistent space below the headline, and the text blocks do not ...


1

Old thread, new solution Go to TYPE-->GLYPHS Ensure the Show drop down is set to Entire Font. Set the font to Symbol | Regular (for some reason this doesn't work on a standard type fram). In the symbols font, toward the end (just before the closed apple) You'll find the individual bracket elements. Adjust the indent, vertical scale and space after ...


1

The problem is with iBooks reader (and just about all the PDF readers on iOS and Android other than Adobe Reader), which doesn't implement most of the interactivity in the PDF spec. To achieve the appearance as designed and retain all the interactive elements, export as Fixed Layout (FXL) ePub (requires InDesign CC 2014 November update). As far as viewing ...


4

When you justify text rather than leaving it left-aligned, InDesign has only so many ways to adjust things so that the right margin lines up. By default, it does this by adjusting the spaces between words. In this case, you are using a very large point size in relation to the width of the line, which forces InDesign to make a wide space between the only two ...



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