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23

First you'll want to desaturate the image (CMD+SHIFT+U), this removes any color and makes it easier to achieve pure white. With your file open, choose Image->Adjustments->Levels. You'll get this: Now bring the two outer triangles in like this (you'll need to play around with this until you get something you like): You should end up with this!


21

I came up with a nice method for cleaning up pictures like this, and it works even when the background or lighting is uneven (that is, far worse cases than the example in this question) and it retains the colour. My instructions are based on the Gimp, but it would be very similar in other programs like Photoshop. Firstly, make a duplicate of the layer: ...


9

Ramp the contrast up with curves. Instructions: Select your image and press Ctrl-M. This will bring up the curves dialog. Move the top point left and the bottom point right until your image becomes black and white. (that rhymes!)


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)


8

I found a quickish method! You had almost all of the workflow, and the 'cutout' part that you had, is what I was missing when trying at first. Starting with this image, because I couldn't find the one you're using: The longest part for me was masking out the background. You may also need to add a Black & White adjustment layer after step 2 if you're ...


8

There's no "Save Selection As" if that's what you're hoping for. The quickest way is probably to do: M (rectangular marquee selection) Ctrl / Cmd+Shift+C (copy merged) Ctrl / Cmd + N (new file) Ctrl / Cmd + V (paste) Ctrl / Cmd + S (save)


6

The first image looks like a direct Live Trace in Illustrator. In order to get better results you can boost the contrast of the image before live tracing it and after that as well. This is how the results look like: It's a good idea to clean some important curves and lines, so that they don't look so random.


6

Being Photoshop, there’s probably quite a few approaches to this problem, but only one I can think of that maintains full vector edited and scaling. There’s a few things going on here. Square is just a shape layer for the square. Nothing tricky there. The Blurry Circle group has a circle as a vector mask. The vector mask is set to subtract and also has ...


5

As far as I'm aware there is no correlation between position in Illustrator and position in Photoshop. If copying from AI, it always pastes to the center of the canvas in Photoshop. I may be mistaken though.


5

Well, you're on the right track. The key is to use layer styles. Here's my shot: Settings: Add Bevel & Emboss. Choose "Chisel Hard" under technique, play around with the settings and use the "Cove - Deep" preset under Contour. Add a dark grey to bright white linear Gradient Overlay. Angle it and limit it so that it begins with the white in ...


5

Here is my shot I have used Drop Shadow, Inner Shadow, Bevel and Emboss, Gradient Overlay and Satin Screenshots of used effects Drop Shadow : [ Blend_Mode:multiply,100%,#000000 ] [ Angle:120, Global_Light:No ] [ 4px:0%:1px ] [ Contour:Defaults/CoveDeep ] [Noise: 0% ] Inner Shadow : [ ...


5

Most art will remain vector. Some things like multiple nested clipping paths are painful to do. See example 1 for just one thing that would be hard to do in Photoshop, not to mention how would you edit this in PS? Example 1: This is trivial to do and edit in illustrator but not so easy in PS. The biggest problem is that you need to come up with a ...


4

There is Image > Trim and choose transparent pixels from the pop up. Sometimes that may leave pixels of a low opacity however. In those cases you can ... A) make a selection and choose Image > Crop B) Use Image > Canvas Size and set the size you want and where you want the cropping to occur. You'll get a warning that the new canvas is smaller then ...


4

You could try scanning it in at something ridiculously high like 600 dpi, then resizing it in Photoshop down to 300 dpi but keeping the same pixel count (in other words - scan it in at 600 dpi; you end up with something like 4960 X 7016 pixels. Resize it to 300 dpi, but keep the actual pixel size at 4960 x 7016. You will now have an image that's larger than ...


4

I ran into this exact same issue a while ago, also while drawing a bunch of small icons. Turns out you can do some pretty neat stuff with the "Blend if… This Layer" slider in the Layer Style panel: Dragging the right slider all the way to the left basically tells Photoshop, "keep everything I draw black opaque, and make everything white transparent". ...


4

I replicated the effect decently with layer styles. It might have been done in Illustrator originally and my approach has some antialiasing problems (I guess it's all the grouping) (see the end of this post for a fix) but it should work all right for most situations. My results: Here's my approach step-by-step: 1. Type out your text and apply a small ...


4

For printing a poster, should I go for 8 or 16-Bit mode? 16-bit color is usually overkill for most any project. Professional photographers will often use it for the flexibility it provides when editing RAW imagery, but beyond that, it's not usually something you'd need to deal with. For putting my poster on web, what should be the ppi because I ...


3

In windows you can use Autohotkey to do this. Autohotkey accompanied with the script below, will essentially do a mouse click every time you press b key. Download the scripthere or alternatively copy it from below. Once you have AHK installed, double click the script and it'll start running right away. To close the script: Right-click the script in the ...


3

If you don't have Photoshop then I'd suggest maybe downloading the free trial of Creative Cloud and installing the app. If you only have this one off need that would probably get you through.


3

All you need to do is choose Image > Adjustments > Levels and alter the levels within the image. Simply drag the left triangle (black) to the right to darken the dark areas and then drag the right (white) arrow to the left to lighten the lighter areas on the image. Viewing the histogram will help. It shows the ramp on the right which is all the ...


3

As far as I know, you can't. The method suggested by Joonas and elaborated by Rachuru is a good option for many cases. When that isn't suitable, here's another option you can try. Not the ideal solution you're asking for, but an option that can help in situations where you have up to 60 layers in Illustrator or maybe 40 in Photoshop - any more and it'd ...


3

I'm guessing the text is black and its background is white. Add a level under the one with the scanned text, and place your background texture there. Then select the layer with your text and select Multiply in the layer blend mode (here, don't care about the layers shown it's just a pic I found online) Then if you want you can also edit a bit the opacity % ...


3

Select the mask layer: Go to Window -> (check) Properties In the Properties window change your density If that doesn't solve, when you select your mask, tell what is your overlay mode in the fields on of your layer list:


3

workaround: use a transparent rectangle with the size of your artboard. not perfect but does the job


3

I believe bmp only supports 8 bit RGB (24bit images) Things can get confusing when dealing with the word "bit" at times. By Adobe definitions..... 8 bit RGB = 24bit image (8 bits R, 8 bits G, 8 bits B = 24). 16 bit RGB = 48bit image (16 bits R, 16 bits G, 16 bits B = 48). Using these numbers, standard RGB images are referred to as 8 or 24 bit. 16 bit ...


3

Ctrl/Command+Click the green channel thumbnail in the Channels Panel Click the New Layer Mask button at the bottom of the Layers Panel Choose Image > Adjustments > Invert (Ctrl/Command + i) Save....


3

Go to Paragraph > then Check Adobe-Every-Line Composer..


3

As your design should just be a guideline, you can make every design you can imagine. In ye olde days, people would slice up photoshop files into separate images and then use frames or tables to stick it back together as a website. This created bulky, non-responsive websites. Fortunately, web design has developed. Every self-respecting developer should use ...



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