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4

Based on the Illustrator JS manual I've come up with the code below. This code does exactly what you want: Creates a gradient with two color stops: black and white Repeats it five times Applies it as a stroke to the active (selected) element A more generalistic version can be found below the line. (1) First we set the desired number of colors and the ...


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You can achieve this with Illustrator scripting. Checking the documentation for CC15.3 in the JavaScript Reference PDF under Gradients on page 68. Create the colors: // Create the colors var startColor = new RGBColor(); startColor.red = 0; startColor.green = 100; startColor.blue = 255; var middleColor = new RGBColor(); middleColor.red = 252; ...


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This will only work if you are using the gradient as a stroke (as in your question). If you want to repeat the gradient endlessly (as opposed to a specific number of repeats) then you can skip steps 2 and 3 and use a pattern brush instead of an art brush. In CC you can now use images in brushes so you may be able to rasterize the gradient instead of ...


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280 m^2 is big, scratch that its enormous in size. It is not that its not possible to fill, it is. It is just that this is a very big task, your going to need quite the team to pull this off. You are going to have some logistical problems on a quite big scale. This is no ordinary graphics design job, it is a engineering job. Get the manufacturers and ...


3

Welcome to GD.SE! I'll second what other folks have said about asking a more thorough question, but for now, here's what you can try: I recommend using a color picker (like this one) and then uploading your image so you can see which colors are being used where. The colors will be provided in hex code format, which you can copy and paste into most places.* ...


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Photoshop is a raster image editor. It works exclusively with pixels, and only whole pixels, no half-pixels. The size and resolution you are creating your document at results in a pixel size made up of non-whole numbers, i.e. you would need fractions of pixels to create the image, which isn't possible. So Photoshop rounds your physical dimensions to the ...


1

Draw a bunch of gradients from color to transparent and stack them on top of each other. I used 5 main colors to replicate it. On the left side from bottom to top a dark blue, a magenta, and a red. Then on the right side from top to bottom orange and light blue:


1

How big is this thing supposed to be? Because what you describe isn't much larger than a sheet of paper. This sounds like the sort of thing you would be doing in vector anyway, If he is going to have it printed on vinyl then it must be done in vector format in illustrator or Corel draw. After you have done the art in vector the size makes no difference ...


1

With regular Layer Masks you could hold Alt while pressing it for it to start out black. With Adjustment Layers there's no real way to do that. Fastest way is to hit Ctrl/Cmd+i to invert the mask after. If you use the same Adjustment Layers such as an S Curve or a Dodge Adjustment and Burn Adjustment Layers for example than you could make an action to do ...


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Click on the Paths tab located in your Layers Palette and then click on your layer with all of the sub-paths on it, probably called "Work Path" When you apply the type to a path, it will isolate the one path—on which you've applied the type—from the others and create a new Type Path. In the case above, I typed a bunch of gibberish on one path, hence the ...


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The answer is very short; No. There is no way to sort fonts in photoshop, other than manually disabling certain fonts in your OS. Which is very hacky and probably not the best idea.


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it sounds like Gimp would have everything you need.


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welcome to GDSE! For what you need, I would suggest using masks In order to do this, the workflow that I would suggest is; Open your file (good start) ;) Make a new layer (bottom right of the layer panel) Hit 'U' to access the shape tool - you'll want to select the ellipse tool as below; Holding SHIFT and dragging your cursor will enable you to make ...


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After you locate the image you want to use for the wall decoration, print it in the size you want to use. For minimizing expense you can print portions of the image on different pieces.TIP: For added variety, solid colour or patterned disks can be made part of the grouping as well as circular graphic or typographic pieces. Decide the position and size of ...


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Comply with the IRE reference levels and the logo will render correctly.IRE = Institute of Radio Engineers. Peak white is not 255, 100%, etc. and reference black is not 0, 0%. The value for IRE peak white is 95% representing specular highlights. The value for IRE black is 3%. Attempting to exceed these in a raster image forces averaging of the signal with ...


1

I have 2 methods 1) Optical Character Recognition Software If you don't need the original image, it may be better to recreate the page. I have used the following site to scan text from PDFs or images: http://www.onlineocr.net/ This online service will scan the document for text and convert into editable Word, Excel and Text output formats. 2) Puppet ...


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If this is scanned text and you don't need it to look like scanned page do some magic in Adobe Acrobat. http://blogs.adobe.com/acrolaw/2013/06/straighten-and-deskew-pdf-pages-in-acrobat-xi/ From Tools select "Document processing". Click "Optimize Scanned PDF", Deselect “Apply Adaptive Compression” and from "Filters" options choose the one that you would ...


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Something I would personally do (because I'm not sure why it would be doing that), would be to copy the layer style to a dummy layer, create your smart object, and reapply the layer style to the smart object which you can now adjust if you need to and it isn't baked on!


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You can do this: Edit> Convert to profile. This way you can fine tune your CMYK settings, and you will not loose any layers. However, if something will be CMYK it's better to start in CMYK, to avoid any color shifts, which can happen even if your RGB colors are within the CMYK range. Hope this helps!



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