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For example you want to change the color of the bricks as shown below. Select the area of bricks of which you need to change the color. Press Ctrl+J to create a layer via copy Once the layer is made, as shown in the figure, add the adjustment layer Make sure the adjustment layer is grouped with the layer below it. All the adjustments will be now ...


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If you add a adjustment layer to the layer you want to adjust you then hold the alt-key down while clicking on the adjustment layer. The layer will then move a bit to the right and now only affect the one layer below.


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I think you just need to combine some of your methods. The way I would approach this is: Put the pic you want to edit on one layer Clone the layer so you have two identical layers On the top image, use a layer mask to hide everything you want to keep the 'normal' colour. Now make whatever colour adjustments you want. Your changes will only apply to the ...


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To print US Letter borderless you probably need to print on a 11x17 then trim down the page. Your print most likely doesn't print to the edge because it needs area to grab onto to move the paper through. Make sure to add a 1/8" bleed on anything and to add crop marks to get a full edge to edge print.


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Very roughly, from your screenshot, it looks like you're dealing with a Photoshop document set to 8430 x 6300 pixels (675 x 520 @ 8% zoom). This is about 28 x 21 inches @ 300 dpi ( 6300/300 = 21 etc) or 14 x 21 inches for half a spread. Obviously you can check this easier than I can using "Image>image size" Your inDesign document should be set to that size. ...


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Open your image in photoshop and check the dimensions of it with ctrl + I – does it match your document size in InDesign or this PSD template? If it does, open the template file at the same time and drag your image across to the template file. That way it'll remain the exact same dimension as when you opened it.


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Effective PPI needs to be 1.5 times the line screen (LPI) being used when printed. In most cases a 150-175 line screen is used in offset printing. This means the effective PPI of an image should be roughly 225-265ppi. 175x1.5 = 262.5 150x1.5 = 225 It's not unheard of to use a more dense line screen though. If your print provider uses a 300LPI screen ...


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The rule of thumb I've always been told to use by just about everyone is 300 pixels per inch. This ensures a sharp image in the average print job. You have some leeway, though. For lower-quality print (like newspapers), 200 or even 150 dpi might be enough. Also, in regular print, if you use an image as a background, you don't need super-sharp quality and ...


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Atleast the image effective ppi is 250+ then it will print on good.


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You need to get a map where the lines for each state overlap perfectly. Perhaps yours are slightly apart. Try not to use opacity to control the colour, select grey values if you need to instead. Map with perfectly overlapping states : http://www.vecteezy.com/map-vector/35270-india-state-map-outline I have made a quick video of how I might do it: ...



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