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16

Stiff, P. (1996). The end of the line: a survey of unjustified typography. Information Design Journal, 8(2), 125–152. No empirical data, but a good overview. Science would tell us that inconsistent word-spacing as a result of justification may inhibit saccadic eye movement by creating irregular “jumps” for the eye to make. I have not read a study that ...


14

You can align to a specific dimension (horizontal or vertical) using the "Distribute Spacing" selection in the "Align" tab. Select the objects you want to distribute, single-click on one object to set it as the anchor object, and enter the amount you want them distributed. Click on either the distribute vertically or horizontally button. You can also use ...


9

First create an equilateral triangle. To do so use the Polygon Tool and bring the number of edges down to 3 using the keyboard arrows. Tap the down arrow to reduce the number of sides. Make sure you hold the Shift key down as you drag with the tool. This ensures the triangle is straight. Then create your circle and align the center of the circle with ...


7

I don't justify any text which I wish to be easily read. Justification can decrease readability. And a ragged-right, left aligned, text block is simply far more visually interesting than a block of text.


7

Really nice design! I think you definitely got the vibe right. Couple of things to consider: The email at the bottom, because the text is in the same font, it makes it a little difficult to read. If you made the first word bold, for example, that would separate it a little more. I find the alignment of the date and the word Lauantai a little confusing. ...


6

I think you are asking about the graphical implementation of an overshoot, commonly used in typography. In short, overshoot is added to letters like A and O (pointy or round—like circle in your example) to visually make them look the same height as f.ex. H and X ("flat", rectangle-like). The sources of the Wikipedia article suggest overshoot of 1–3 % or 5 ...


6

Easiest, fairly universal instructions: Duplicate the shapes by copying and pasting in place. Take the shapes - something like this: On the duplicates go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points --- you'll get something like this with it perfectly centered on each edge (with my awesome circling skills for added emphasis): Drag the duplicate and the ...


5

Place the guide at your starting point, adjacent to the edge of the object you'd like to move it away from. Make sure lock guides is off. Click the guide, hit Enter on your keyboard. In the move dialog type the distance you'd like the guide to move either vertically or horizontally. Bing! You're done.


5

In the top right corner fly out menu of the transform panel, you can select or deselect "Align New Objects To Pixel Grid" globally for all future objects/paths (see below image) For each already created path/object use the checkbox in the transform panel itself The paths within the symbol might be set to "Align To Pixel Grid". Disabling it for the specific ...


5

Align objects To align a line to the center of an ellipse left side we can use the Object > Align and distribute tools. Align the top of the diagonal line to the vertically centered horizontal guide in the ellipse. Align top edges Align the left borders of the diagonal line and the ellipse. Align left edges Snap to nodes or handles while drawing ...


5

Select the oval with the Move tool (V). Choose the Reflect tool (O, might be hidden under the Rotate tool in the toolbox). Press and hold Left Alt to have three dots show up with your reflect cursor. While still holding, click your vertical axis/guide. Enabling Smart Guides (Control/Option+U or View > Smart Guides) may help getting your click location ...


5

I've had this problem before. If its the same thing I experienced...here's your answer...Make sure that inside your transform tool, your "Scale Strokes & Effects" and "Align To Pixel Grid" boxes are UNCHECKED.


4

The layout feels uncomfortable because it is unbalanced, like putting a filing cabinet on one end of a see-saw and nothing on the other. Probably the simplest solution to this is to put the labels in line with their respective fields, instead of above them. Since we're not in a sidebar, there's no reason to be parsimonious with horizontals. Left-align the ...


4

Draw a line , or any object, at the edge of the object. Then use Object > Transform > Move to move the line the distance you want. Then use View > Guides > Make Guides to make the line a guide. With Illustrator any path can be made into a guide. So basically just create objects and then turn them into guides. In fact, if you have an existing ...


4

Canvas Flip Positioning in Photoshop uses 0, 0 as the top left. So, if you want to position an element from the bottom left, there is a way — You can flip the canvas, position the element, flip the entire canvas back, then flip the element. It's not ideal, but it'll give you positioning that's relative to the bottom left. Resize and/or edit the canvas ...


4

Your text of course ought to be justified. Two more things are necessary: Proper hyphenation of words. This allows more even and better interword spaces. Good line length, which should not exceed 66 characters per line in average. If lines are too long, the eye of a reader is often not able to move to the next line when reading the text and sometimes one ...


4

This cannot be done without a script such as the ones provided by Trevor Morris here.[1] "Distribute Layer Spacing" are the ones to look for on that page. 1. is there an easy way or photoshop plugin to distribute words in evenly spaced formation


4

you're probably best to do this when setting up a new document in the document set up dialogue box. i think you can also turn it off in the preferences which would be a good idea because in my experience it does nothing but cause trouble!


4

I've managed to achieve what you're after. First off though, your code was very messy and in future you should prune/clean it before asking others to help you fix it. I took a 15 minute look at your code to understand it, and then rewrote the parts you're asking about with much less mess. This is what I get with the structure I've prepared for you: The ...


4

I answer accordingly to your example, thus it is not universal answer. Press A (or click on Direct Selection Tool) and select right upper anchor point of your left shape (tail) - write down X and Y coordinates (let's call them X1 and Y1) from transform panel (window-Transform), then - click on right lower anchor point of your left shape (tail, X2,Y2) and ...


4

Here's another way to do it: With everything deselected, select only the vertical line of the curved shape by clicking on it with the Direct Selection Tool Copy the line, then Paste it in Place (Shift + Ctrl + V), and hide the curved shape so it's out of the way. You should be left with the triangle and a path like so (in Outline view for clarity): ...


4

Yes, you can use Object > Rows and Columns... to distribute objects into... rows and columns. Just set the spacings to zero, and the number of rows to 1. The number of columns will be calculated automatically from the number of selected objects.


4

Horizontal and Vertical Alignment Regarding your first question, you can't actually vertically align text inside a layer. What you do instead is explained in the first answer to this question, that I think is very valid for any type of element: For positioning text you don't need a bounding box. I never use bounding boxes for text in PS. I click the ...


4

If I'm understanding correctly, it looks like the Keep Options on your Paragraph Styles might be messing you up. Go to the Paragraph Style and check the options: You want it to be zero, so it does not 'Keep' following lines with the paragraph, otherwise they flow to the next column.


3

Move them. Put them at the top. Put them both to one side or the other and stack them. Put them both under the signatures. Put one at the top and one at the bottom. If your Given Parameters are making something impossible, change one of the givens.


3

Do you mean, you want to get objects perfectly stacked so the top of one just touches the bottom of the next one? If so, you can do this like this: Select them all In the align window, switch it to align to key object Make sure the numbers box is set to 0 Hit the distribute objects vertically button in the bottom left of ...


3

The Fuzzy Select tool only selects areas of similar colors. To select the entire star, after clicking the black outline hold down the Shift key and click the yellow interior and each of the eyes. Or, perhaps easier, first use Rectangle Select to select a rectangle around the star, then switch to Fuzzy Select and subtract the white area around the star from ...


3

In Flash go to : View > Snapping > Edit Snapping... And enable the last two checkboxes there from the Center Alignment options... After you do this, when you move you object against your fixed object(you don't have to lock it or anything) some guides will appear, when the object is close to the center of the fixed object, or close to its edges... have ...


3

It's slightly tricky if you didn't start with centered text (which will increase from the center point when you increase the point size). You can work around this, though. Set the transform proxy on the control panel to the bottom, right or left center depending on how the scaling needs to go and which center you need to lock in. Increase the width and ...


3

I really hope there's an easier way in photoshop. If I had to do it in photoshop here's how I would do it: Draw a reference curve Place your seats along the curve When done, align with: Distribute Horizontal Centers Add guides and vertically align the seat with the "matching" one Now you can duplicate this row, for more rows Not the most elegant ...



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