Hot answers tagged

36

Yup, these are legitimate things and they have names. "Visual alignment", or, "Optical alignment" This is the general principle - you're aligning by eye by what visually looks right, rather than by rule. It's used not just in typography but anywhere visual consistency is important, for example in designing icon sets - making icons with curves look neat ...


31

If you look at many fonts you'll notice that the curvature of the letter 's' pierces the perfect alignment of the baseline and of many other small letters. And as a general rule round shapes tend to do this - pierce the baseline of straight edges. I had an article about this phenomenon, and why it happens, somewhere in my bookmarks but the link evades me at ...


26

You can align to a specific dimension (horizontal or vertical) using the "Distribute Spacing" selection in the "Align" tab. Select the objects you want to distribute, single-click on one object to set it as the anchor object, and enter the amount you want them distributed. Click on either the distribute vertically or horizontally button. You can also use ...


21

Stiff, P. (1996). The end of the line: a survey of unjustified typography. Information Design Journal, 8(2), 125–152. No empirical data, but a good overview. Science would tell us that inconsistent word-spacing as a result of justification may inhibit saccadic eye movement by creating irregular “jumps” for the eye to make. I have not read a study that ...


18

Yes. Simply choose Align to Artboard in the Align Panel or Control Bar. Then click the various align buttons.


13

This is a technique called overshooting (or overhanging). The reason why we use overshooting is because the way we perceive things as humans (at least in terms of pure mathematics) is inaccurate. Don't believe me? Let me explain: Consider this image: Does the circle and triangle feel like they have the same weight to you? The truth is that they have ...


12

In the top right corner fly out menu of the transform panel, you can select or deselect "Align New Objects To Pixel Grid" globally for all future objects/paths (see below image) For each already created path/object use the checkbox in the transform panel itself The paths within the symbol might be set to "Align To Pixel Grid". Disabling it for the specific ...


11

This cannot be done without a script such as the ones provided by Trevor Morris here.[1] "Distribute Layer Spacing" are the ones to look for on that page. 1. is there an easy way or photoshop plugin to distribute words in evenly spaced formation


11

Center aligning paragraph text is most often not a good choice. Human comprehension has been dutifully trained to view text in certain ways and when you center-align paragraph text you ask the reader to work very hard and maintaining the visual path through the text. This isn't felt to any great degree when looking at short, one or two sentence, paragraphs. ...


11

First set Left Indent to where you'd like the text to start from and then set First Line Indent minus that amount.


9

I don't justify any text which I wish to be easily read. Justification can decrease readability. And a ragged-right, left aligned, text block is simply far more visually interesting than a block of text.


9

First create an equilateral triangle. To do so use the Polygon Tool and bring the number of edges down to 3 using the keyboard arrows. Tap the down arrow to reduce the number of sides. Make sure you hold the Shift key down as you drag with the tool. This ensures the triangle is straight. Then create your circle and align the center of the circle with ...


7

Really nice design! I think you definitely got the vibe right. Couple of things to consider: The email at the bottom, because the text is in the same font, it makes it a little difficult to read. If you made the first word bold, for example, that would separate it a little more. I find the alignment of the date and the word Lauantai a little confusing. ...


7

The Bootstrap Documentation doesn't seem to have a great example for this as far as I can tell. I set up an example to try to visualize what Bootstrap does with the columns (I added your guide lines for comparision). The gist of it is, the column div is full width (Box #4) but has left and right padding (15px) so the content of the column will be padded ...


6

I think you are asking about the graphical implementation of an overshoot, commonly used in typography. In short, overshoot is added to letters like A and O (pointy or round—like circle in your example) to visually make them look the same height as f.ex. H and X ("flat", rectangle-like). The sources of the Wikipedia article suggest overshoot of 1–3 % or 5 %...


6

Easiest, fairly universal instructions: Duplicate the shapes by copying and pasting in place. Take the shapes - something like this: On the duplicates go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points --- you'll get something like this with it perfectly centered on each edge (with my awesome circling skills for added emphasis): Drag the duplicate and the ...


6

I've had this problem before. If its the same thing I experienced...here's your answer...Make sure that inside your transform tool, your "Scale Strokes & Effects" and "Align To Pixel Grid" boxes are UNCHECKED.


6

I wouldn't have a problem with the text if it had 2 or 3 paragraphs less. Centering works good for small quantities of text, but becomes a readability issue when having too much of it. From this point of view, left align is better than centered (or right aligned). Left aligned text is easier to read than centered text for paragraphs. This is because ...


6

Seeing the larger picture, so to speak, I think your suggested right-flush design won't work. The name would be buried over on the side, with the bullet points wrapping around it, rendering it either clutter or invisible. If your goal is to make this document a quick reference, then the reader is going to have to work to find the person's name, and the "...


5

Place the guide at your starting point, adjacent to the edge of the object you'd like to move it away from. Make sure lock guides is off. Click the guide, hit Enter on your keyboard. In the move dialog type the distance you'd like the guide to move either vertically or horizontally. Bing! You're done.


5

If you have the Creative Suite you can do this in Illustrator and then bring the objects back into Photoshop. In Photoshop, duplicate the objects to a new file, save, and open the file containing the objects in Illustrator. Click on the black arrow selection tool on the tools menu. Go to Window --> Align to bring up the ALIGN dialog box. Hold SHIFT and ...


5

I had been having this problem FOREVER and I just found a solution, even though the person I was talking to about the move tool made me actually figure out the problem. The alignment tool is selecting the top most layer where ever you click, regardless of what layer you have selected/transparencies. Try hiding the layers above what you are trying to work ...


5

What I would do in this case is the following: Select the two nodes relevant for alignment Choose Path > Break apart to generate a separate object from the vertical line. Select first the text, then the vertical line Now open Object > Align and distribute with setting Relative to Last selected Align the objects according to needs: To align the ...


5

Align objects To align a line to the center of an ellipse left side we can use the Object > Align and distribute tools. Align the top of the diagonal line to the vertically centered horizontal guide in the ellipse. Align top edges Align the left borders of the diagonal line and the ellipse. Align left edges Snap to nodes or handles while drawing +...


5

You can realign the point text with the original. This could be useful if you ever used point text an need a second line below aligned. Do this: select your text. hit copy. realign your text (yes it moves). paste in front. align the realigned text with the align tool. delete the old copy. Animation 1: This is what the described sequence gets you.


5

Select the oval with the Move tool (V). Choose the Reflect tool (O, might be hidden under the Rotate tool in the toolbox). Press and hold Left Alt to have three dots show up with your reflect cursor. While still holding, click your vertical axis/guide. Enabling Smart Guides (Control/Option+U or View > Smart Guides) may help getting your click location ...


5

turn on Smart Guides and Snap to Point assuming both shapes are grouped, click on shape 2 with the Black Arrow (V) grab the Group Selection Tool (White Arrow with the Plus sign) and Click and Drag on Anchor A... ...and drop it right on top of Anchor B (press Ctrl before releasing the mouse to help snapping) grab the Rotate Tool (R), click on ...


5

I don't have any articles to back it up, but I can tell you from experience that you are correct. Just like manual kerning, spacing and aligning letterforms (and other objects) like this is part science, part art. Let your eye and gut guide you rather than exact numbers and math.


5

The empty impression is caused by the image not the text. Take imdb.com as an example and look how they fill all the box with the image. For me the way to go is left aligned text for readability and consistency and then playing with the sizes of containers and images depending on the proportions of each one. I would not recommend "tall and skinny" images....


5

I would need to know a bit more about its usage and functionality to make a better answer, but with the information I have... You could keep it simple by putting the arrows on the circles and using just one line. Something like this:



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