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14

A lot of this answer is also posted in this related question on how to animate illustrations for the web. Avoid SMIL animations Sara Soueidan, probably the best animator of SVGs on the web, wrote "I know I wrote the guide to SMIL animations but, seeing their future, I don’t personally use them anymore." You shouldn't either. SMIL animations don't work ...


9

If you are targeting free, possibly GIMP and Inkscape will do. Other free/open source wares like Synfig Studio, a 2D animation software and Blender, for 2and3D are worth a short. But since you are talking about working from MS Paint there may be a steep learning curve for you on the latter. But if you really wish for serious animation, you have to put your ...


6

Animation is not terribly hard, per se. It is just that doing animation is time consuming and requires some practice. The reason why you do not see very many people around you doing animation is in the tediousness. So unless you have a burning passion in telling the kinds of micro stories that animation requires, then most likely even a few minute long ...


6

Something to consider is traditional art tools. They are really cheap, and there are many high-quality ways to digitize your work later. You don’t have to create the art digitally to make digital art when we have really high-quality cameras and scanners today, which you can rent or borrow if on a tight budget, because you only need them when a whole notebook ...


5

I am going to concur with the, use traditional media eg. pen and paper. Sure its not software, but for drawing comics it is invaluable. You then move over and either ink in real life or ink digitally, and scan your work. If you do not have a scanner use a camera to capture the image but a scanner is super cheap these days. But if you are after software for ...


3

An animated gif is a sequence of images (in your example, 100 images), and is technically possible - but obviously not suggested - open the file with the GIMP and edit each layer. As you said, there are a lot of simple solutions for images with an alpha background (perhaps the simpler way is described here), but replacing a color is a bit difficult. There ...


3

I think it conveys an active brain but could be a little better I think. Things I would try out to see how it looks: Making the white dots move quicker and having more of them Add some scaling of the whole brain in a pulsing action Different patterns of animating Edit after second demo posted: Much better! It looks a little jumpy though, you might ...


3

I hope I'm understanding your question correctly. Here's a video of what I would do. https://www.dropbox.com/sc/quc1bgda0x8mh72/AABuk811PlV7OX3DItcXwFuxa Create a shape that simulates material drooping over the ball using the pen tool: Click on the top edge of the blanket shape and pull a handle out horizontally to the right click on a point halfway up ...


3

GIMP is free and has a lot of features like photoshop: http://www.gimp.org/ I own photoshop and corel draw, and I still use GIMP for some features. I also keep GIMP on a thumb drive as a portable install, and I can use it wherever I plug in. Here's the portable install of GIMP that you can put on a thumb drive: http://portableapps.com/apps/...


3

If you want a simple way to get you started with such animations look at Scratch. From the Scratch 2 beginners' guide "By the time we make our cat dance for the first time, we'll forget all about the academic research and theories behind Scratch. Instead, we'll focus on having fun and creating the next project."


3

Your movie clip 'piechartmask1' has a blank keyframe at the end of its timeline, and that's why it is disappearing (flickering out). You could shorten the symbol to be only a single frame in duration; it would then not need an actions layer or a stop command and would persist indefinitely.


3

Here is a free web site for doing this (that, however, allows only for producing low quality GIFs): https://3dthis.com/morph.htm Another software is Morpheus Photo Morpher, which is not free but seems to be more powerful and equally easy to use.


3

There is the APNG (Animated PNG) format, which has actually been around for a long time. Browser support is patchy at best though and support in image editing programs is even worse. APNG is an unofficial extension to PNG and was officially rejected by the PNG group. You can see some examples of animated PNGs here (you'll need to make sure you're using a ...


2

This is real easy in gimp. You unoptimize the gif to reveal all pixel data in layers (filters/animation/unoptimize). Delete the layers, 2 first in your case, then optimize it again (filters/animation/optimize for gif) Export as gif, tick the animation box.


2

I second everything in HandsomePhil's answer and would add: Ungroup items if you won't need to reference the groups when working with your SVG. This will eliminate extra <g> tags. Limit the number of colors. Fit the artboard to artwork bounds (Object > Artboards > Fit to Artwork Bounds in CS5).


2

You should probably do your Compositing in a Compositing application. If you have a CC Subscription then I'd suggest using Premiere Pro for this step. If you're working in either an older version of Photoshop or just bought a PS only license then there are alternatives including the now free DaVinci Fusion which is actually more powerful than Premiere. ...


2

Sounds like you know more than me since admittedly I'm a beginner at AE. But I believe you would set up a null object. Attach that to the end of the arms. Then pickwhip your hand to the null object including position and rotation. Might need to use some sort of formulaic calculation on those points to fine tune it as well. See this link for how to get ...


2

One idea is to start fading the next layer in immediately, then it would not jerk. Im not sure this is better though. Or you can fade them in at any later point. Experiment. Another idea, sprinkle the next layer, so the triangles keep popping up at random times. This saves you from the (possibly) extra shades that are needed. It may also look better. ...


2

To get a static view of your project without any zooming, you can just create a new window for it and use screen capture software to record that window. With your project open, just use Window > New Window and make it whatever size or position needed (you can drag it to a different monitor outside of Illustrator too). The caveat with this is that some of ...


2

To find the right tool panel in Photoshop: For Photoshop CS5 and lower, access the animation window by opening “Window” + “Animation.” Likewise, click “Window” + “Timeline” in Photoshop CS6 and Photoshop CC to access the Timeline window. For Photoshop CC, click the drop-down menu in the middle of the Timeline window and select “Create Frame Animation.” Then,...


2

Have you tried the Bodymovin plugin? It's a hacky little extension of After Effects that allows you to export any composition you want to SVG. Works for us!


2

You can use PNGs or SVGs (which both support alpha transparency) and animate it as a CSS sprite animation. Here's one example.


2

My opinion is the second image works best. Definitely conveys an active brain. In terms of "brain", I kind of feel the overall image is too tall. I'd probably still get "brain" from it if you never posted that's what it was. But it is closer to a pecan or walnut shape. The brain is more of round shape, as opposed to oblong. Shorten it so it's square, or ...


2

How can I create/export SVG's that contain stroke, stroke-width, stroke-dasharray, and stroke-dashoffset fields? With Inkscape this is really easy: Create stroke: Draw or import your object, select the object, then simply pick a color from the palette while holding Shift or set the stroke directly in the "Fill and Stroke" menu (Shift+Ctrl+F). The ...


2

This answer from the ImageMagick forum solved the problem of combining files into an animation convert 'image-%d.png[0-20]' output.gif


2

You can create a shape tween to transform the frames by adding interpolated results in between. Read this help page on shape tweening. However, this only really works out in cases where you planned  to do the tween beforehand*. You can try a blind shape tween but the results are going to be hit or miss. There is no guarantee that it will work out well....


2

Is it feasible? Yes. Just as you have thought about it, it is definitely possible to do it like that. A better question is "Are there better ways to do this?" in which case I would answer probably. The only time that I would use SVG for this is if most all of the elements that you want to zoom in on are originally SVG (such as icons) you're trying to ...


2

“Trim.” Cropping is reducing the dimensions of the canvas. Slicing is splitting a clip into 2 clips. Trimming is shortening a clip from either the beginning or the end of the clip. Typically you will see “trim handles” on the left and right of a clip that enable you to trim the beginning and/or end respectively.


2

You have a wonderful Photoshop Alternative online called Pixlr.com. You also have a free animator at http://www.animaker.com/ Here is an article about free animation software you may also find helpful: https://www.nyfa.edu/student-resources/best-free-open-source-animation-software/ You will find that whether free or purchased, though, you will still need to ...



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