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13

There are two reasons ClearType text is so crisp. it uses subpixel rendering. I don't think Photoshop supports that. it uses aggressive hinting to fit lines into the pixel grid You can type your text in Notepad, screenshot it with some nice convenient tool, and paste it into Photoshop with blending mode Multiply (because it's black text on a white ...


9

Photoshop is not a web designing program. To get text that looks the same in a browser as in a graphic (jpg, gif etc) you have to use the same font in both programs. Some fonts are not used by all browsers. Depending on the size of your text, a good mid-sized font could be Tahoma, Helvetica, Trebuchet or Georgia. Check out this website for some good ...


7

This is called clearType in windows (or sub-pixel rendering like Marcelo said) The idea is that instead of using 1 value for 1 pixel:(127,127,127) < Gray we can make the left side of this pixel less intense and the right side more (55,127,185) - Blueish tint and then the same for the right sided pixels (185,127,55) - Orange ting below it shows (no ...


7

Ignore the anti-aliasing. It's entirely irrelevant in this situation. When you're ready, save the PSD, then Save As a PDF. Uncheck the option to keep the file editable in Photoshop, or just use PDF/X-1a as your PDF type. Your text exports as vector information, not rasterized, so the various Photoshop settings don't apply. Here are two bits of text inside ...


6

This is a product of using diagonal lines on a grid (which is essentially what a PNG is: a grid of pixels). Here's a diagonal line on a grid. Each of the squares represents a pixel, greatly enlarged here. Some pixels need to be only partially coloured. It's not possible to colour a pixel like this. It needs to be all one colour. Without anti-aliasing, ...


5

I found that just by changing two pixels in the middle of the second image to white, I could make it a lot more clear: Here they are at normal size: It's definitely a little better. So, you might do well just by scaling down Helvetica and then zooming in all the way to see what's making it fuzzy, and then fixing it from there. I didn't spend a lot of ...


4

If you look at how it renders at dafont.com you'll see the same problem. It's not limited to Photoshop. It looks even worse in the OS font preview because, like many cheap fonts, it doesn't seem to have any hinting information at all. You'll get a somewhat less obnoxious rendering if you use "Smooth" rather than "Crisp" for the anti-aliasing, but any ...


4

Unfortunately, no, there isn't a way to, using the tools that Photoshop has by default, replicate the different browsers' rendering (note that all browsers render text in a distinct way). That's one of the reasons lots of designers create mockups straight in html/css, because of these discrepancies. There are, however, Photoshop actions and plugins you can ...


3

Unfortunately Photoshop doesn't support any kind of a subpixel rendering. Nor does any other Adobe software—with the exception of Dreamweaver. (Well it is not exactly Dreamweaver's technology, as it just renders the HTML and then passes the text for the operating system to be rendered.) The suggested workflow may be that you create and slice your design in ...


3

You should rasterize it in the right pixel dimensions directly from Illustrator whenever possible, but when you're resizing things in Photosohop there is a choice of resampling modes: Nearest Neighbor - This is the simplest form of resampling, if you can even call it that, where the original pixels are just expanded to the next full pixel to fill the new ...


3

This connects to my question from a few weeks back. I feel there is still not a great answer for "How do I determine when a webfont can cut it vs when to use graphic type?" I outlined how I make that determination, though it's still fuzzy. The bottom line is, you need to test webfonts in multiple browsers on multiple systems as early in the design process ...


3

Photoshop doesn't AA text quite as well as most OS' native text rendering since it uses Photoshop's own AA algorithm, which doesn't make use of subpixel rendering (therefore it probably doesn't make use of ClearType hinting that's embedded in many fonts). But even if it did, every implementation of AA has its limitations and detractors. Some people prefer ...


3

Never rely on any print provider to do anything other than spit out your file as it currently exists. I would never trust that something will be output in a specific manner to ensure it is as I expect. If you have to provide instructions or notes on how to output, then it's a recipe for error. If you place a 25ppi image in Indesign it never gets "upsampled" ...


3

Screenshots on Retina Macs are exactly what you may expect: They're double the resolution and pixel density of non-Retina Macs. For a Retina MacBook Pro, full screen grabs are 2880×1800, with the pixel dimensions of elements double the size. When overlaid with a screenshot of a non-Retina Mac, so that they're both the same physical size, the elements on the ...


3

Antialiasing is a blurring effect, and for small type on business cards, you should avoid it at all costs. Typefaces should be output as vector, especially at small sizes. You comment that you have no proficiency with InDesign. If you have the program, use it. Now is the ime to learn it, and a business card is the perfect small project. You can do the ...


3

Once you have created each shape (I assume that's what you're doing -- if not, that's how you should do this so you can see what you're doing) and scaled to taste, select its path using the Path Selection Tool (black arrow version). Copy. Ctrl+C (Cmnd)⌘+C Create a new, empty layer and Paste. You now have a duplicate of the path on a new raster layer and ...


3

I'm going to try and answer this question based on the given information regardless of format but under the assumption that these are large-format banners going by the hard dimensions given... If you are combining large elements like this, I would highly recommend that you move your layout work out of Illustrator and into InDesign or Quark, then output to ...


3

My guess was right after all: If the letters are intended to be displayed in a computer monitor, and the smallest portion of a screen that can be black is an entire pixel composed of three little lights, that would cause the smallest dot in any letter to be fairly large, but if the anti-aliasing composed by surrounding or inner dots can be represented for ...


3

Try increasing the pixel count: if your image is 450px wide, double it to 900 and then downsample at the time of export. This will give you more pixels to work with when describing the curves and diagonals. As an aside, in computer graphics--especially games--you may have encountered anti aliasing methods such as "2x FSAA" What this means is that the ...


2

A possible work-around might be to use the "sharp" anti-aliasing method and set a 0-depth inner glow on the text layer: For this sample I used white color, 85% opacity, "screen" blend mode, 0 choke, 0 size. Not as good as Ms clear-type, but it looks less boldy... (first line = no anti-aliasing, last line = sharp anti-aliasing without the inner glow)


2

If it's existing photography, then there's nothing to anti-alias. It sounds like perhaps you are scaling your raster images up and simply noticing the pixels more at the larger sizes. Increasing the resolution of a raster image means the software has to make up the missing pixels. That usually results in a less-than ideal result, but sometimes it's ...


2

Anti-aliasing is a technique to reduce the pixelisation of text on relatively low-resolution screens, and has no use in print. If you had to use Photoshop and therefore raster text, you'd be best using no anti-aliasing and upping the resolution to a much greater value - maybe 1200ppi or 2400ppi - at which point AA wouldn't be noticeable, even if it were ...


2

There's several issues here. SkarpaLT appears to be designed as a display face. Most thin letterforms are designed for that...posters, headlines, etc.--basically where you'd use them large. They aren't designed to be used as small text faces. Most screens are still rather low-resolution. The smaller the type, the harder it is to render it cleanly on a ...


2

As a heavy user of all latest Fireworks versions I couldn't find this feature up to current CS6 version. I think it has something to do with the fact that ClearType is a patented Microsoft technology. In addition to your links, this thread on Adobe forum has some tips how to simulate system anti-aliasing in Fireworks. You can tune Fireworks styles to match ...


1

Saving it to PNG-24 is the best you can do. By the way, please check my example, this is a transparent PNG-24 image below. The first 3 lines are created in Illustrator and placed to Photoshop as Smart Objects. This is a lossless method, the line is drawn every time from the source, which is a vector based line. The 4th was a rectangle I rotated to this ...


1

Use PNG-24 instead of PNG-8 to save your file. The jagged edges won't be a problem. A pattern when saved with PNG-8 appears like this when zoomed. When the same pattern is saved with PNG-24 it appears like this: The difference is that PNG-8 can save upto 256 colors while PNG-24 can save a million colors( I hope you can calculate the exact number by the ...


1

Photoshop will always anti-alias shapes, which in most situations is what you want. When designing icons and other small-scale items, quite often that's not what you want. One way to avoid the problem is to change your workflow slightly. Create and combine paths, rather than shape layers, then stroke and fill the paths. For strokes, use the Pencil tool ...


1

Actually all those paths are anti-aliased, the top image and the bottom image. If you look closely you can see the subtle grey line for anti-aliasing. The difference is an arc or angle will always require more anti-aliasing than a straight path. To assist you can tick the "align edges" option which appears on the Control bar when a Shape Tool is active. ...


1

I still haven't tested this, but I think I figured out a workaround. In troubleshooting another issue, I came to know the option "Color to Alpha", which seems exactly what's needed here. I think I can get Antialiasing like usual against one specific color and then use Color to Alpha to turn that color into different degrees of transparency. This would work ...



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