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20

The Lowest Common Denominator vs. Highest Common Factor Approachâ„¢ Define how much available space you have by creating, placing, and balancing empty elements within your design. I chose to use the Golden Ratio for the above (100px x 161px) because it's better to work with a horizontal rectangle, than it is with a perfect square based on most logos being ...


8

I think in that particular example you should scale the two logos both to one reference which is the text ... because when it comes with aligning two logos having texts, you should consider the text proportions first. and in your example the two fonts of the logos looks similar. align the text to the same base line scale the two text in logos to have the ...


7

It's called "Optical center" Basically, the reader’s eye will start in the upper left and move towards the lower right, passing through the optical center (in a country that reads from right to left, reverse things) That's not the actual geometric center. Make 2 lines from corner to corner on a rectangle and the point where the lines meet, and that's the ...


6

I work at a nonprofit and have to do this frequently when including sponsor organizations, etc. on flyers and invitations. What I generally do is start by sizing the logos so the type sizes are equal, and then tweaking individually based on the overall size of the logos in proportion to eachother.


4

Things that help designers focus on what's important to a design: Identify the key message - this is what people viewing the design should intuitively grasp, this is the voice or message of the design. Everything in the design should help reinforce the message. This is a careful balancing act as being too blatant can be off-putting and not everything in a ...


4

I have also had to do this frequently and it gets really difficult to keep the printed piece from looking like a NASCAR race car. My process is that I start by making things the same size and then tweak them by eye (sometimes using "soft eyes" - defocusing so you only see "blobs") so they are visually balanced.


4

From a visual point of view, a design doesn't have to be symmetrical to be balanced. Balance has to do with the weight of elements on both sides of an axis (or multiple quadrants). Check this other question for example. Elements with different sizes can still be balanced: You can also have an even number of elements that have the same size, but use other ...


4

A feeling of order and tidiness, that leads on a feeling of rightfull/good, and good readability. As human being we tend to give meaning to things, as well we tend to organise the caos that surround us, just because it looks in disorder, like could be a desk or an house. Having information organised on a invisible grid helps us to achieve this order of ...


4

There is a certain depth that two well-paired type families lend to a design. Varying weight is good for certain applications but, as you note, it can fall flat if an International Style affect isn't what you're after. The magic is in the pairing and their structured use. Finding typographic soul mates Pairing type is an art that comes with experience but ...


2

Rather than using many fonts, pick one font with many weights or faces. You'll get the flexibility you want without the "FontBook threw up" look. Just off the top of my head, Helvetica Neue has dozens of variations, from Ultra Thin to Extended, Light to Extra Bold, and a Regular and Oblique of each one. There are a few foundries who make Bodoni with lots ...


2

I would recommend you check out the GuideGuide plugin for Photoshop. It can create grids on the fly at your preferred amount with gutters and rows and the whole "nine yards". With something like Bootstrap, I always tell designers to not focus on how many grids there are. Even the width is relative. It can easily be customized with LESS variables (defining ...


1

I would expound on one of the previous answers in basing your design on Bootstrap templates - if you're time and budget conscious, you'll first select a technology (HTML/Wordpress/Drupal, etc) then a preexisting template for that technology and only afterwards work on branding the template instead of starting with creative and then looking for ways to ...


1

I would suggest that your next step is not to move into Photoshop but instead start designing straight in your browser. There are many grid based CSS frameworks you can use for this. A few popular options are Foundation, Bootstrap and Skeleton. Alternatively you can always create your own. Foundation, Bootstrap and Skeleton all use variations on a 12 ...


1

Your example isn't balanced. Your primary action needs to be emphasized, as in the example. For the best UX, I would place it in the right corner so users aren't trying to tap across the other tabs, leading to possible accidental hits. You could give it 40% of your space and give the other three 20% to further support the hierarchy. In iOS, it's common to ...


1

I don't know of any tool to do this automatically, but possibly of help is to convert the image to LAB color space, and examine histograms of the A channel and B channel. See if there are as many points to the left of the center (which represents grayscale) as to the right. If not, adjust the rectangles proportions and examine again.



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