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90

Stay Simple - Don't try to do anything too fancy or adventurous at first. Get the basics down first, then you can start experimenting. Don't try to emulate the Star Trek computer interface. Be Consistent - A consistent design is part of the foundation of a good design. Keep track of your margins, sizes, and placement and maintain them throughout the design. ...


14

From a technical standpoint, ideally the logo should be readable on any of the colors that your office uses for that particular logo. The question of printing on white or black is typically necessary for certain branding principles, but in some cases there are examples that show certain designs that are required to be printed only on certain colors, and ...


13

Jim Krause's design basics index gave me a very good summary of the basics of composition, color and type. I wasn't a huge fan of most of his own examples, but they illustrate his points really well and he touches on a few valuable things I haven't seen mentioned much elsewhere. And perhaps most importantly, reading it made me really excited to go out and ...


11

There's sometimes a slight overlap between web development and web design, but I don't think web developers should try to be full-time designers unless they're willing to put as much effort into it as they did learning to program. It's not something that you can just dabble in on weekends and be good at. If this is so you can learn to be your own web ...


9

I'm a programmer myself and for me the following books where very helpful for me: The Non-Designer's Design Book - Robin Williams - This books covers the basics of graphic design. Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain - Betty Edwards The book for developing your drawing skills. The Humane Interface - Jef Raskin This book provokes some thoughts about user ...


9

Even Google Maps does not have a single symbol: Patrick Hoffman is a user experience designer for Google - including Maps: "Google Maps visitors probably don't think twice about the little pictures that dot its maps, but an icon's creation can be a fraught process, he says. "Some of the best landmarks are places of worship because they tend to ...


8

Perhaps not relevant to all cases, but for web prgrammers one of the biggest things that stands out to me, which perhaps bridges the gap a little bit, is to learn CSS inside and out, as being able to design well doesn't mean anything if you can't integrate it into your project that you are creating.


8

Nate implied this in passing but I think it's worth emphasizing: one of the key features for a logo is for it to be effective (readible or legible and recognizable) at very small sizes, medium sizes and very large sizes. Some designers make variations for different situations, but in general it should be able to communicate its message equally well as a ...


7

I've been doing my own research and found an option that seems to work okay. It gives the writer an imperfect but near-accurate version of the layout to work in, and takes almost no time away from real work to produce it. It's based on turning a PDF into a Word doc... the very idea of which makes me feel unclean... but it seems to work, and the copywriter I ...


7

Sooner or later, a company logo will need to be reproduced in just one solid colour/channel, where even halftoning or greyscale aren't achievable. You'd normally use a special variant of the logo for these purposes of course, but you need to consider how the underlying design will adapt. Will it still be recognisable? Perhaps not if effects, or even ...


7

To answer your questions by order I'd say : Keep older drawings Even crappy one can be a source of inspiration one day. Any medium would do the trick. Try many and choose 2 or 3 at the end. Stick with it if you enjoy using them. It can even be computered drawing too. It depends on what you're working on. For example, for webdesign, there are ...


7

I've helped a few organizations - some were ongoing, others were one off tasks. Most of the organizations were from Idealist.org The issue was complete lack of organization: One organization posted looking for someone to design and send out their newsletter. They tell me they're interested and would be in touch. Next thing I know they're telling me I'm ...


6

This stretches the question a bit, but as well as the logo artwork itself, you're going to need to need some guidelines on how to use it. This might be as simple as a couple of bullet points, e.g. Only resize the logo proportionally - don't stretch it in one direction Make sure it's legible - e.g. don't place a red logo on a red background, ensure text is ...


6

In my experience, sooner or later most company logos need to be reproduced in just one solid colour, or 'channel' in applications where even halftoning/greyscale aren't achievable. Fax used to be the classic example. This isn't often a concern these days - but here are some other real life examples I've dealt with: Low resolution single colour printing: ...


5

Do whatever removes the obstacles to working. Don't get hung up on the medium (paper vs. pixels) or the size or the permanence. I sketch in small notebooks, in Photoshop, on a wipe-off board, on the back of an envelope if I have nothing else to hand. It's convenient to have it all in one spiral-bound notebook, but don't let the lack of it prevent you from ...


5

In 2004 I found myself halfway between both worlds, as I had been for most of my life -- I'd been doing web since HTML 3.2 in the dot-com days; raised with an Apple //e by parents (a choreographer and an educator) who allowed and encouraged me to spend a lot of time with art. Design is not art, and in fact some of its more algorithmic patterns line up nicely ...


5

Historically, issues would be: reproducibility: Can it be faxed, photocopied, mimeographed, shown on 480TV, etc? resizability: can the logo be increased/decreased in size and still look good? cost: can the logo be reproduced with 4 color or spot printing without breaking the budget file complexity: can the RIP software process the file to begin with? can ...


5

Great question. The answer depends partly on the context, and won't be the same for every job, but here are some general guidelines. In some situations, there will be someone actually wearing the copy editing hat, and you can refer problem passages to that person. In most settings that's not the case, so the designer either edits the copy or adjusts the ...


5

I always use tabs with an underline leader. The method of creating lines, then anchoring them in text makes for sloppy editing later. And using repeated underscores doesn't allow for proper alignment. Another option, depending upon desired design, is to use Paragraph Rules: If I want anything containing more rules than these two methods I move to ...


5

Good question. I've never done web design in multiple languages. Well, not manually. I've used some multi-language CMS template packs like Smarty. I honestly don't know how well they work though. And it ultimately wasn't any concern. I've never had a client specifically ask for web design in a language other than English. However...... I have done print ...


4

Just my opinion.... Sometimes. I work with many clients. Several of my clients utilize copywriters. When a copywriter hands me (or the client) text, I treat that text and written in stone. No change will be made to the text without first consulting the writer. If, for no other reason, this is done as a professional courtesy to allow the writer to control ...


4

What you need is an InCopy with InDesign workflow. InCopy does exactly what you require (and is made for exactly this task). There is nothing else out there, frankly, that doesn't involve klugy workarounds. With InCopy, your copy editors and writers work with the exact layout, they can see exactly how the copy flows and where it will overset, but they can't ...


4

I recently ran into this exact issue with a client, and it took great effort to convince the client and another designer against it. Basically, we were engaging in a brand development project for a client whom we were also building a website for. Very early on, the other designer suggested a "neon sign" look. The client loved the idea and latched onto it. ...


4

I have worked on some sites that have been translated into several languages, so I hope I can provide some insight. How can you account for this and what are some good practices for content mockup? Some of it is just common sense, like don't put any words in an image because then you can't translate it. Instead, store everything on the page as a series ...


4

The basics from Favicons - Best practice for 2013: ICO favicon.ico (32x32) PNG favicon.png (96x96) Tile Icon tileicon.png (144x144) Apple Touch Icon apple-touch-icon-precomposed.png (152x152) And a "painfully obsessive" cheat sheet to favicon sizes/types on GitHub. Always worth a read: ...


4

The icon used for religious places will differ from country to country. Usually unique symbols that represents each religion is used. Here is an example from a Sri Lankan map where it's 4 dominant religions are represented with 4 different icons. I'm not sure how universally accurate this is, but in most countries putting your hands together symbolizes ...


3

It is a BAD habit to not rename your layers. Regardless of whether they're simple or complex, grouped or solitary, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera - you should always name your layers! When you need to get something done quickly, there are few things more annoying than opening a PSD or AI file with dozens of unnamed layers and objects. When this happens, ...


3

There 3 ways to work: starting on paper starting using the software starting directly on the code (for web designer projects. There are people that are suggesting to start directly to code and not lose time in prototyping) There is no good way or bad way, it is mostly habits on which way it is the best to help you to juice out your brainstorming process. ...


3

To bring it down to the simplest statement: Avoid any treatment that requires transparency effects (including use of blend modes, drop shadows, etc.), gradients or textures in the basic design of the logo, wordmark or logotype. Use solid colors. Be sure it works reversed out of a dark field as well as on a light field. Once you have that basic shape and ...


3

Re translation: I must second Scott. Translation into a foreign language by a reputable service requires at minimum a translator (who should be a native speaker), an editor, and a proofreader. Translating is not merely replacing words; it's also understanding idiom and context. (As an example, "blockhead" in English translates to "testa di cipuda" in ...



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