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Printing When printing the rasterization engine does quite many pixels. Thus it is not likely to generate a gap. A gap can still form from misalignment of plates but this would happen even if you would overlap because the rasterization process would still overlap the elements. That is unless you overprint Other considerations Printing aside, overlap is ...


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Watch out for overprints The only risk with the overlapping approach is when you over-print. With a good printer, they'll take care of it and it won't matter. With a bad printer you have a whole host of things to worry about anyway so just find a good printer (^_-) Best practice I think it's best to leave the overlap in place. I say this for the simple ...


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The overlaps will have no bearing on printing. What you see in Preview Mode is what is printed. That is what "preview" refers to. It makes little difference if you remove the overlaps or not. Upon production output, colors are trapped to each other. The area of visible color is what is output, not the shape boundaries. It doesn't really alter anything if ...


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There's an art to it In visual perception a color is almost never seen as it really is — as it physically is. This fact makes color the most relative medium in art. // Josef Albers Color theory is where the physics of light and the psychology of color become much more than their scientific parts. Like choosing and setting type well, using color ...


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I have struggled with this topic throughout my career. I really admire designers who are gifted when it comes to color. I have a dribbble bucket devoted just to color palettes that I admire. Text Contast I use the WCAG color contrast checker to check text and background color contrast. I will only use combos that pass Level AA; this will soon be required ...


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I would love to comment on here instead of answer, since I feel that my reply is more useful to anyone like me who is starting in the design field. However, I am new, so I don't have the ability to comment yet. I'm sure that as a designer, you've heard of Color Theory, and have hopefully read Color Theory books like Itten's Elements of Color, or anything ...


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Consider mixing colors like a painter would on a palette, this allows you to do different graduation and sometimes mixing colors gets you new hues you didn't think of. This is a alternate approach that combines to the way @Matt/@cockypup suggests. The benefit of this approach is, that it is a bit more organic, thus allows for random surprises that can help ...


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This actually sounds like a question more about creativity and getting out of a comfort-zone than about technique but I will answer the technical side. How do you determine what colors work well for what objects? (i.e. "bright red on a canary yellow is too bright for good readability", etc.) This question is a little general, but to address your ...


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An interesting concept I first learned about on a male fashion advice page is to pick color combinations that occur in nature. For example, browns, light greens, and dark greens (forest); grays, light blues, and white (sky with clouds); etc. Obviously this isn't the be all and end all of color choice and combinations, but it might be a helpful thing to keep ...


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This might not answer your question completely, but as part of my workflow, I use this technique sometimes. When trying to pick a colour palette (at the very beginning of the creative process), I try to recall from my memory an image or painting that fits the "mood" or "content" of the project. Then I take that image and, using Photoshop, I apply a ...


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When I pick a color palette I narrow my selection to a max of 3-5 colors but I expand on those colors. For example, I usually run a script in Illustrator that will allow me to place each color in its own master palette and a variation of the color based from highlights and shadows I've used throughout the year help produce a HEX and RGB output in CSS. This ...



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