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14

Talk to the production house and ask them what rich black they prefer. There is no single rich black every print provider uses. Each print provider has their own formula for a rich black. And, in many cases, the print provider may want simply 100% K and they will adjust the black to match their own environment. Therefore, the best option is to ask the print ...


8

Welcome to what is probably the Number 1 'gotcha' for people new to print design :-) and yes, people who encounter it for the first time not pre-warned almost always run into just before a deadline... RGB black is simple. It's just no light coming from the screen. CMYK black isn't simple. There's black ink (the 'K' in CMYK), but even with 100% black ink, ...


7

By "pure black," I guess you and they are referring to a completely neutral black. Of the three things you ask about, only one potentially has that quality: darkness. "Black" animal fur and natural (not dyed) human hair are actually very dark brown, as a close examination will tell you. (I don't necessarily recommend close examination of a panther, except ...


7

A few years ago if you had asked this question then the answer would have been a resounding yes! However we've been redefining design styles and ideas lately so it's now a little more complex. Yellow can work on a black background, but it's as much about fonts and where the colour is used that affect the overall look of the site. Make sure you're using ...


7

To be honest with you, I don't think there's an actual name for it, as it hasn't been separated into a design trend of it's own. However, looking at the photos you attached, I do notice something in particular: The futuristic design that uses white and black is usually very clean looking and give an impression of evolution. You see, we have to look at a ...


6

Although it was a pretty funny comment, yellow text on a black background is not a designer hate crime. Here are some sites that play with that concept. It's important to note that what you'll find throughout all these great sites is some consistent themes though. They never go full, true black background They never use yellow text as paragraph text where ...


5

I suspect this came about by working in RGB to start with, then converting to CMYK. This would turn your RGB(0,0,0) text into a colour composed of all four CMYK channels, rather than pure 100% K. As Marc and Scott say, body text should be 100% K. (If you did need a stronger black, you's be better of going for a double hit of the black plate rather than ...


4

This is more of a community wiki sort of question, but the obvious problem is that with super-fine lines (small type sizes etc), your type may at the very least become fuzzy because of the dot screens used to compose CMYK. At the worst, the plates are misaligned slightly and you get color halos. I have seen both in print.


3

I use rich black when ever there's more than an eighth-inch of area to cover. What that means if large type with thick strokes or area of solid black call for rich black in my opinion. I never use rich black on body text or small elements. I don't believe there's a "rule" or practice for when or when not to use rich black. It's all merely designer choice. ...


3

Shifted plates are always a concern in smaller elements. But there really isn't any advantage to rich black in small elements anyway since you won't notice the difference (except when there's a problem). The bigger issue to be mindful of is overprint vs knockout. If you'll be using your black over photography at large sizes you have to remember that black ...


2

Based on comments.... Command/Ctrl-Shift-Click each layer thumbnail for the shapes (Layer 2, Layer, 3, layer 4 copy 2, etc.) This will load each layers transparency as a selection. The Shift key will add to the current selection. So, with each Command/Ctrl-Shift-Click on a layer thumbnail, you should see the current selection grow by that layer's shape. ...


2

The concept of color is a somewhat muddy area of science as much of it is psychological, and there are many contradicting definitions in the words we use to describe color. For instance, sometimes people use "color" to refer to hue or chroma or colorfulness or saturation, but these are all technically distinct concepts. For this reason, you'll often hear ...


1

Having your file in CMYK is your best bet, I'd say. You can check whether your adjustment layer yields rich black by 'stamping' a copy of all visible layers (select your topmost visible layer and press Shift+Ctrl+Alt+E) and use the eyedropper to check the CMYK values. If there's just black, then it's a poor black/grey, if there's also C, M and Y, it's a rich ...


1

Getting a "blacker" black is just one of the advantages of rich black, it also helps to reduce banding, especially in modern digital printing processes, but also in lithographic print, and it tends to dry faster for large areas of print where litho inks are used... seems to not really make sense as rich black will have more ink coverage. but solid blacks ...


1

What everyone else has posted is exceptionally accurate. I can't really add much to their definitions. But it is interesting science... the eye does not see color, it sees refracted light. Red objects appear red because they don't absorb red light and bounce it back. Our eyes pick up the reflected light which is from the red spectrum of light and we ...


1

I won't give you the the science lesson but here you go Our brain is actually interpreting light quality because our brain functions like that. Our eyes are broken up to see light in 2 ways. Brightness and quality or as we call it color. If our preceptors for color didn't exist then we would be seeing a black and white film all day and night. We will ...



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