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23

The bottom part is gaussian blurred and has a semitransparent white overlay. Step1: Select the overlay area on the background (the original image) and apply a gaussian blur of radius 12px. Step2: Create a new layer, select the same part for the overlay, fill it with white, and give this layer an opacity of 66% Reproduced with the upper part of your ...


19

I created a similar effect with the Gaussian Blur tool in Photoshop set to a 60 px radius. Of course, you can do this with any photo where you like the color shifts, your sample reminded me of a beach, so I found a beach photo on Wikimedia. Another way you can do it is by creating the shapes you want and then applying a Gaussian blur to them:


19

To the best of my knowledge, you can't do it exactly the way you are asking. The quick and dirty way, without duplicating the actual layers and then flattening them, would be to Copy Merged (Ctrl + Shift + C) and paste to a new layer. Another potential workaround is to group all the layers you want to blur and convert them to a smart object. You can then ...


12

Simply highlighting one of Farray's methods. This seems to work best for me. Highlight all the layers in the Layers Panel. Right-click (Win) or Control-Click (Mac) and choose "Make Smart Object" / "Convert to Smart Object" (CC 2014). Now, apply a blur to the Smart Object. This will leave the original layers in tact. If you need to access the original ...


12

For anyone interested, you can achieve this effect by drawing a rectangle above your image. Then apply: Black fill at 70% opacity Background blur at about 25px


12

After applying drop shadow effect, go to Filters-Filter editor dialog box.At the bottom of the dialog box there is Filter general settings tab for changing the co ordinates & dimensions. Adjust the value until you get a drop shadow following the path without any break. Image1-Drop shadow with default filter setting values Image2-Drop shadow after ...


10

You can't just overlay a 'blurry' image that blurs the random image behind it. The blur effect needs to sample the image behind to transpose/spread the pixels, so it needs to be applied there. You can however make a sandy/grainy texture and use it as a multiply layer to get the grainy texture look. Update - As Derek suggests in another answer, you can make ...


9

The best way I know to do what you're after is to apply a small blur may times. This gives you the most natural gradual change. Enter quick mask by pressing Q. Change to the gradient tool by pressing G. Draw along the axis you want the blur to follow, covering the length of the object. Exit quick mask by pressing Q again. Choose Filter > Blur > ...


8

Taking a look at the second image you have provided, something like this is not possible with a PNG overlay. That is absolutely done programmatically in some way and not with a PNG overlay. I have tried some of the other suggestions posted here, none came close (but perhaps you will have better luck) This is really going outside of your requirements, but ...


8

Create a selection before applying the blur...


8

Alright, the main point I want to emphasize is somewhat a combination of the other answers plus a bit more. You've got a very powerful compositing tool in your hands, and are barely using it. This is just one take, and its very much subject to opinion, but hopefully the reasoning behind it leads you to some ideas for your own take, and helps others. I ...


6

Another option is to create a smart object, and apply your blurs and effects to the smart object. Doing it this way, will still let you open up the smart object and change what is inside of it. ---Edit--- Since I have posted my above answer, the question has been edited and changed slightly. The request is to now achieve a blur in an iOS app, I would ...


6

Your example looks like a real photo (amongst other things, the moire is a give-away). Sometimes the best approach is the most obvious one. 1. Display the image on your screen. 2. Take a photo of it. Honestly, that's a better way to go than spending hours using digital effects and creating something that's likely to look unrealistic.


6

You can have a look at this question for some ideas: Making text stand out in front of images. Additionally, why not simply add more sky on top and shrink the city building to be below the logo and not interact with it. Right now your high building is what takes away the contrast; the tower is dark and so is that part of the logo. Here's a suggestion, ...


6

Whenever I encounter such a situation, the first two things I think of is adding a Drop Shadow or an Outer Glow, considering the logo and colors, you should use and Outer glow to make your logo stand out from the background. This way, wherever you wanna place it on your image, it'll still be readable and look nice, see:


5

I'm not a Gimp user, so I won't be able to help you much there, but I can give you some suggestions on how to create this effect in Photoshop. There are basically 2 components to this. First, you need to simulate an LCD display or some other physical surface the image is to be projected onto. Secondly, you need to create perspective cues via 3D perspective ...


5

You did not define what program or technology you are using. So, while Peter described a nice way to do it with Photoshop, I would like to add that this effect can also be created using CSS3. Here's a peak into the CSS needed: #iOSblur { -webkit-filter: blur(12px); -moz-filter: blur(12px); -o-filter: blur(12x); -ms-filter: blur(12px); ...


5

Paint.net and Gimp Below is a detailed example of how to do this in Photoshop. However, both Gimp and paint.net have the same capabilities, though the tools have slightly different names. The Gimp equivalent to Photoshops magic wand tool is Fuzzy select. You should be able to achieve the same result. photoshop. Select the white background with the magic ...


4

If you'd like everything to remain editable and scalable at a later date, your best option is to use a shape layer with some mask feathering applied. That way, you can change the colour, add a gradient or do whatever you like to the circle layer(s), even scale them up or down with no negative side effects. Note that there's a few ways you can make the ...


4

I suspect you have Feather set to something that is not 0. Make sure it is set to 0 px.


4

There is couple good filters on Dribble about how to make blur in Photoshop. Maybe these could be helpful also for you. I like especially this non-destructive way to get effect. I know there is already something about this, but here is the links: http://dribbble.com/shots/1210251-Live-Blur-Free-PSD ...


4

Looks like blur + tonal adjustment (curves, levels or similar). Here's a quick attempt at the effect. The BLUR top group contains the purple text. The BLUR shape layers are the text, with a mask feather applied (basically gaussian blurred text, which could be done many ways). Using a shape layer means you can scale the document while maintaining quality. ...


4

Sounds to me like you want a Motion Blur: You can find this filter in the image menu under Filters → Blur → Motion Blur Playing card image courtesy of Byron Knoll


4

What I see in the image, which I think is what you're asking about, is some posterization. Whenever you deploy very smooth gradients you can run into this issue if the display doesn't have the bit-depth or color gamut to render the gradients smoothly. Ironically, perhaps, blur not only doesn't help, it can make the situation worse. Working in Photoshop on a ...


4

You can achieve this using a combination of smart filters & clipping masks. First create all the shapes you want to use as blurred areas and add them to a new group With the background image you want blurred selected go to Filters -> Convert for Smart Filter. This will convert the image to a smart object and allow you to apply filters ...


3

One method: you can shoot a photo with your mobile camera behind frosted glass. Another: make your DSLR camera lens out of focus sufficiently in your viewfinder and shoot.


3

There is many ways to accomplish that dept of field effect you are looking for, so I'll just link you to some of the tutorials I found: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/creating-shallow-depth-of-field-using-gimp-9722 http://tutorialgeek.blogspot.com.ar/2011/02/fake-depth-of-field-in-gimp-dof.html http://gimpguru.org/tutorials/simulateddof/ ...


3

To skew the shadow properly, you need to rotate it, then use "transform->distort" I shortened the item and then adjusted the top edge to align with the horizon. After you do this, you can duplicate the shadow layer and apply blur to one copy. Add a layer mask to the blurred layer, select the mask itself by clicking on it in the layer palette (if selected, ...


3

Photoshop - Lens blur worked for me. I took a clear landscape and just tweaked until I got a blur just like in the photo.


3

I used vanishing point to get the angle. Copied the layer. Applied lens blur to match the blur part to the most blurry part in your image. Applied mask, and oval gradient at right to mask blur, and also applied tilted reflected gradient. Then, applied black gradient left to right and somewhat titled and set mode to desaturate lowered opacity. Then, copied ...



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