Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Traditionally stock sites allow you download a free, watermarked "comp" image which can be used in your design until the client approves the piece. Once the client has approved, you can then go back and purchase and download the non-watermarked image. You are free to purchase and download the non-watermarked image whenever you'd like however. It's not ...


8

It's recommended to start new chapters on the recto page of a manuscript, as it establishes a predictable flow for the reader to follow. The resulting occasional blank pages are actually a part of establishing this rhythm, making the divisions between chapters even more distinct. This recommendation is listed in rule 1.48 requires login of the Chicago Manual ...


7

Your best bets would be "The Non-Designer's Design & Type Books" by Robin Williams, and "Before&After, Graphics for Business" by John McWade (in that order). They cover the mistakes, but also the core principles you should keep in mind while you work. Both are very approachable, well-written, simple and full of the kind of excellent design wisdom ...


7

Wow...it looks like you're not getting a whole lot of help here. I'm a graphic designer operating a design company here in Japan. To get you to where you're trying to be, I recommend using any "Mincho" typeface. That's the serifed variant in Japanese typography. If you have some Japanese fonts installed on your computer, they should have the name "Mincho" ...


7

Out of curiosity, I looked at the book in question to see if there was colophon information. Some books include the typeface names used. This one did not. Then I did a search for 19th century free ebooks with type specimens and found one called Shniedewend & Lee Co's specimen book and price list of type, Shniedewend & Lee Co, Mackellar, Smiths & ...


6

Edit: Here's something that came out recently (2013): Go: A Kidd's Guide to Graphic Design by Chip Kidd. It gets very positive reviews which tend to say that, while it's aimed at kids, the content is strong enough that it's good for adults too (I've not read it but thought it worth mentioning). Maybe a design magazine at the lighter end of the market ...


5

Without a tablet or touch device, your best bet is to use vector graphics. I mean, some pretty incredible drawings have been done using mice and trackballs, but it takes a lot of time and patience to develop the kind of control you need for drawing on such devices. If you're doing raster drawing though, you're better off just spending $40-50 to get an entry ...


5

There are many applications that can do this. I have explained two options that you may consider: (1) Paid Applications: (from Adobe) a. Photoshop - Image manipulation b. Illustrator - Vector Graphics c. Indesign - Layout your cover page/book exactly for Print & Publishing (2) Free Applications: (Open Source) a. GIMP - Image manipulation b. Inkscape - ...


4

See Philip's comment. LibreOffice is just not a tool for book design. It is a tool for book authoring, and lacks almost all the tools necessary to design a book. On the subject of book design, there are some quite competent articles on About.com, and a fairly good two-part video tutorial here: (Part 1) (Part 2) Keep in mind that there are two quite ...


4

I'm not entirely sure what you are asking, but it sounds like you want to be able to retain the text of the book in a format that is flexible, and have some (relative) longevity to it. Based on that, you're going to want to try and find the most basic and universal file format you can that will give you the features you need. .doc/x is a fine format, ...


4

Duplex printing is a function of your printer and it's associated drivers and software. Indesign simply prints pages. It is the printer's job to duplex them if it has that capability. The Brother MFC-J6910DW specifications do state it will duplex. You simply need to tick the option in the print dialog. THere should be an option for "2-Sided" or "Duplex" in ...


4

Lèse majesté is offering solid advice. My own recommendation on where to start would be to find local evening classes in drawing. There are several levels of skill to master: knowing how to see (not as obvious as you'd think), knowing how to draw, and knowing how to draw with a tablet. In most countries there are the equivalent of American community ...


4

Paraphrased from the Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition; section 1.105 - Separate versus consecutive pagination): the decision for whether page numbering continues or begins anew in a subsequent volume rests with the publisher. They recommend that a publication with two volumes with a combined index at the end of the second volume would be easier with ...


4

Speaking from experience of reading books to my three sons, which are now five years and below. I must add that this may apply mostly to younger kids and elder toddlers. However, I still think the below holds true for nearby ages as well, in many cases. Likewise, I'm also considering making children's books, and these are the main things I would consider ...


4

The Geometry of Design is not about the web specifically but it is a great book on proportion systems in layout and product design in general. For what it's worth, phi is not the end all proportion. There's a lot more value in considering standard view port sizes or the proportions of the screen. The beauty of phi has been most notably exploited in the ...


4

Lowercase roman numerals: i.1, i.2, i.3, ii.1, ... Alphabetical: a.1, a.2, a.3, b.1, ... As long as the reader can navigate, any scheme is acceptable. Unless you're publishing in an industry that has a particular set of expectations.


4

The most straightforward way to do this is to export to PDF, then use the PDF booklet printing option in the Print dialog. As you have seen, the Print function from the Book Panel doesn't offer a booklet printing option.


3

Could be the all-to-common scam of getting you to submit work (for free), then they want you to pay for the book. Basically, they do a very small run for the people that submitted work.... it'll never be seen by anyone else. They elude to it being an "artist directory" of sorts, but it generally isn't. They make their money by selling the books to those who ...


3

It's tricky to make a recommendation. You say "booklet", which implies a small project, but I assume if it's successful you won't stop at one. Here's the thing: no matter what software you use, you're faced with a significant investment of time learning to use the application, and from a practical standpoint I consider that a very important consideration. ...


3

Seems like we don't have any Japanese users active here, which is a shame because that's a great question any typographer might need to answer. I've had Chinese to typeset (only a character or two at a time, in an English translation of "The Art of War"), not yet any substantial quantity of text. I would assume you'll receive the text from the translator in ...


3

As for the exact combination of dropshadows, gradients, colors, and the like, it's like @DA01 said in his comment: that's as much about style trends as anything or an attempt to maintain branding or a templated design within a given publication. The style of an infographic depends entirely on your target audience. Developers of presentation and ...


3

Contrary to popular belief you don't need to know how to use Photoshop to design for the web. A growing trend and very modern technique is "Designing in the Browser" Designing in the browser is using HTML and CSS markup to create your design. It saves time money and resources. It eliminates the problem and misunderstanding clients have when the ...


3

A good title for you would be "How to Wow: Photoshop for the Web" by Jan Kabili and Colin Smith. It covers what you're asking about. Another "how to" book that isn't directly web-oriented but will give you the techniques you're looking for, and then some, is "Photoshop Classic Effects" by Scott Kelby, which is a cookbook of exactly what the title implies: ...


3

There's not much to it. Wikipedia sums it up well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_ratio Keep in mind that in the context of graphic design, it's somewhat of an arbitrary building block. As such, it seems to be abused much more than used meaningfully. Barring nothing else to go off of, staring with the golden ration isn't a bad thing. Just don't let ...


3

I would have to recommend Doyald Young's books. If you don't know who he is, you can check out a short documentary of him and his work: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8_tOrJHIr8 http://doyaldyoung.com/books.html


3

Easy Way: Use the Template Generator: https://www.createspace.com/Help/Book/Artwork.do Hard Way: Follow the Specs: Create Space offers several book sizes as shown in this table: The author will have to pick one of those sizes, interior page colors, and a page count. Once you know those, you should be able to determine the exact submission requirments ...


2

If you're interested in the visual treatments applied to plotting data, then pick up the Tufte books: http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/ He's the 'godfather' of data visualization from a graphic design perspective. Will he have specific data to explain visual design trends? Probably not. Sometimes a visual treatment is simply a trendy thing to do, ...


2

Yes, absolutely. Either of those programs will give you complete flexibility over where you put the diagrams and how they're sized, how the text does or doesn't wrap around them, the font and indents of the code sections, headers and footers, how pages break, and so forth. Word is for writing letters and legal documents, not for page layout. Illustrator ...


2

While Indesign or XPress would be decent tools to use.... Actually, for text books and manuals I highly recommend Adobe Framemaker. Few have ever heard of Frammaker but it's been around for many, mnay years. It's specifically designed to handle book content that has a great many internal references and call outs such as technical manuals.


2

I've used an prefer InDesign for book layouts (300+ pages). The Page Masters, Paragraph/Character Styles, and grep styles are pretty easy to use and provide great control of your formatting. I advise setting up your master pages and styles before getting to far on the project to be able to most efficiently apply your formatting. As Mentioned ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible