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25

How did they do this without computers? They used rulers. If you exclusively know how to draw with a computer: that's a straight edged object, to help guide a pen or pencil into a straight line. For really advanced technical drawings, such as the curve graph example, there were templates with different curves (elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic): There ...


14

Engineers and scientists of different branches used to have drawing classes on their curriculum. Many of these people were quite accomplished at this. We used to have row upon row of drawing boards in the classrooms in the design/engineering departments. The drawings were drawn with pencil and then inked for final results. They would then be reproduced on ...


6

A lot of the old engineering books have a chapter on drawing - for example, I have "A textbook on Electric Lighting and railways" International Correspondence Schools, Scranton, PA, 1901; the first 100 pages or more are about technical drawing. We had to learn technical drawing in school (1970s UK). One practical way to draw the lines on the graph is to ...


5

Here in Switzerland there are quite a few multilanguage Examples with multiple languages on one page (even more than two). Most differentiate with color. (I don't have any example around but it really is very pretty). -- If you don't have color as an option this falls short. In addition to color many use different positioning for the type area. This way ...


4

The basic tools were, for students and small shops, drawing board, T-square, triangles (30-60-90 and 45-45-90 and sometimes adjustable-angle ones), pencils (non-repro blue was favorite since it didn't have to be erased, but black was used too), compass sets (center-wheel K&Es (Keuffel & Esser) and Dietzgens were probably favorite) and Rapidograph ...


3

The covers are always centered, but the interiors are typically consistent. If there is a large amount of decoration, it is typically fully centered (with gutter adjustment) but with any "bookish" content still biased to be consistent.


3

There's a few ways to do this and of course it depends on how you plan to build your layout. Italic A common way to do this is using italic instead of different fonts. Some countries prefer the "main language" to be bigger and/or top on position, and the other language(s) will be in italic. Other countries must have all the languages with the same size ...


2

There's no rules about how you should use your colors for a cover. If there's one thing you should keep in mind is where that book be sold and make sure the titles are easy to read. One example, if you plan to sell this book in library, a lot of these books only have the top 1/3 of the cover visible on the shelf! For this reason, it's sometimes a good idea ...


2

You're right, you need to align your artwork in the live work area (yellow) for best results, NOT the page. You can look at most hardcover or paperback books, you will notice they are easier to read if there's more room in the middle. And because of the binding, when you open a book the central part where the binding is will curve your sheets and give ...


2

I could not find an "automatic" method, but I did find a method that could help. Select the pages you want to define as one section. Right-Click > Numbering and Section Options In the "Section Marker" box (not "Section Prefix") type in "1 - " (I added spaces before and after the hyphen). Repeat for each following section, changing the "Section Marker" to ...


2

Found some info on this, afterall. However I'm still unsure as to any "manual" measures that can be taken in larger publications... Shingling: A means of positioning type in books, magazines, newsletters, or other publications designed to be bound by means of saddle-stitching that compensates for creep, an increasing book thickness through the ...


2

from the Adobe Forum: The continued numbering option only works for a continuously threaded text frame -- one long story spanning several pages. You probably have one single stand-alone text frame per page. Either make all the text frames into one long story -- you can link two frames together by clicking the Out-port of the first and then ...


2

I don’t believe I’ve ever seen this particular variant before, but it is very similar to Linotype’s Egyptienne F™ and Bitstream’s Humanist Slabserif 712, which are almost identical (both based on a design by Adrian Frutiger from 1956). Here is a comparison of a line from the book and Egyptienne F™: It’s impossible to tell, due to the small size and the ...


1

OK, to formalize my comment: Make a set of base styles ("Heading"), then set "Heading - Color 1" paragraph style in each document to the option "Based on {style}" (choosing the "Heading" base style) and then only set the color swatch. When you sync, you only sync the "base styles" and therefore the custom overrides are preserved.


1

I'm only comenting about the images. will feature scanned actual photos that I've touched up in Photoshop 1) Scanned. That means you have the original in paper or film? Use a high dinamic range scanner and scan at the resolution you will need. 12x18 so you need a file 3600x5400 px. That meant you needed to scan the 8x10 photos at 540 ppi. The minimum ...


1

The appearance of photos and anything linked is NOT displayed at the full quality that you designed them at. To run faster, InDesign by default will show the photos as "Typical Display" settings. Change the quality for a single image: Right click on the frame -> Display Performance -> (pick quality level) Change the quality for all images: View -> ...


1

When you're trying to identify a font, it's the details and unique characters that matter. Your image provides next to nothing on either point. Nonetheless ... Looking closer, those fuzzy characters might be ... Linotype Egyptienne F From this low-Earth-orbit view, it appears to be a version of Century, probably the ITC version. If you can find a ...


1

Ho-ho, the book is dated 1940! Now look, back in those days and up to when computers started appearing "technical drawing" used to be an obligatory subject at high school (well, at least down here in Russia). They would teach you just how to handle those weird devices mentioned above, if you're up to becoming an engineer. 1) Things used to be drawn using a ...


1

Such artwork was generally referred to as "technical drawing" and was very much a part of the syllabus for all qualified "technicians" (ie. those attending formal training colleges) and also many graduate engineers. If you just search for terms related to "manual technical drawing" and "manual draughting" you will find lots of stuff on the subject. Or ...


1

I think depends on 2 main things. Design The trim area does not necessary means that you do not touch or put something in this area (like with a photograph). A side note: Thoose margins are (in my opinion) too small to have text, so that is not a "safe area". In my opinion a safe margin is arround half inch or 12 mm on the outer borders. If you are ...


1

Interesting question. I do not have a definitive answer. But it reminds me of soviet constructivism: https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=constructivist+ilustration It reminds me also the metropolis poster: https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=metropolis+original+poster which probably had some futurism influence: ...



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