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13

Something like this should get you started. The key is to imply motion by making the text appear to be trying to go somewhere. and because we read from right to left to right, make go from left to right. Note: the graphic is awful looking, but it is there to demonstrate a concept.


13

There are several ways you can represent "fast" in a logo. One way is to "italicize" the logo (text and/or graphics) which conveys movement. The more you angle the content, the more speed is implied. However, too much angling could distort your work. Adding lines behind the movement might help. See GiantCowFilms example for this. You might also consider ...


12

I've found when I don't have a clear winner its because of a few reasons: I didn't set up inspiration boards. Contrary to what most people say its GOOD to have reference, not always but most of the time. Being inspired and stealing are completely different things. I didn't set up clearly defined needs for design. Who is the audience? What are some designs ...


10

To maintain brand identity a logo should generally have a set color scheme. Generally... Full color Two Color (if appropriate) One Color Reversed If you vary beyond this and start swapping colors for every projects you greatly degrade any brand identity unless the color variations are for a very specific reason. Think of any major brand... does their ...


10

Logos would be done with paste-up: text might be created using a linotype or phototypesetting machine. I personally used a machine that had fonts on wheels approx 12" in diameter which you rotated and selected individual characters using a footswitch. This exposed the type on a strip of photopaper and at the end, you'd had a line of text which you would ...


10

If you know of the opponent-process theory, you will know that there are 6 'special' colours: Black, white, red, green, yellow and blue. Although the receptor cones in the eye are sensitive to Red, Green, and Blue, prior to processing the brain encodes the information using 3 channels: Black:White Red:Green Yellow:Blue These 6 colours are thus termed ...


9

I'd start by looking into the business decisions for having both MyCompanyLLC and MyCompanyCo. It seems to be more of an accounting/legal distinction rather than any purposeful branding/marketing decision. At that point, you need to decide if the objective should be to better distinguish between the two companies, or if in the eyes of the customer (be it ...


9

I would first ask myself, why is the client picking typefaces at all? Are there brand standards in place I have not been made aware of? For the record, there's nothing which states two or three or fifteen typefaces are too many for a logo. If designed well the quantity of typeface variation is irrelevant. If you can pull off a great logotype with six fonts ...


9

FedEx uses the arrow in their design: As other people point out italics often represent speed as well. Here's an image I found googleing for things that might help. This combines an arrow moving right (The direction that it is being read) with speed lines on the left (again, the direction it is being read.) In addition, the word "express" is in ...


8

First of all, was the logo designed "for the website," or is this the company logo? If it's the company logo, those are the corporate colors, and I don't think you should start adding other colors because you think the existing ones are "boring." In certain industries, "boring is beautiful," and adding "flash" makes the client look bad. That's the opposite ...


8

It's a policy issue, not a technology one. You should have a brand identity style guide document of some sorts that shows the appropriate use of the visual elements and what to do and not to do with them. Templates can be provided as a courtesy--but it has to be a policy: "All distributed materials must adhere to the Style Guide. All marketing materials ...


8

Similar to Ryan's answer but more a choice from your own branding guidelines. You can use Ryan's suggestion, or you can use the one that's even better from your guidelines. The one on the bottom left: I think it's beautifully branded by the way. Something like this - you can pull the template straight out of the PDF you linked to:


7

I agree 100% with DA01's comment. Without some sort of mandate coming from above, any technical attempt can be undermined at-will. However, Word does have a "Protect Document" feature. In Office 2003, it only allowed editing of comments. As of Office 2007, you can create forms and allow just the forms to be edited. It appears to provide fairly decent ...


7

To me, a logo is a simple graphic 'device' which identifies a brand. A brand will only have a single logo (possibly with a small number of variants for different media or 'sub brands'). A brand to me is a much broader thing, encompassing the feel of a company from a customer's perspective. For example, a company like IBM has a brand which is very 'serious'. ...


7

The problem you actually have isn't the one you think you have, but it's one that every designer faces often: the clients actually have no idea what they're looking for, so they have given you a list of vague concepts instead of a clear design brief. Your job at this point is not to start trying to design something. It is to work with the client as long as ...


7

A storage room full of vertical files. Vertical files full of photomechanical transfers, paste up boards, sizes and sizes of photostats, type sheets. These took up rooms, often warehouses to store if the agency was a bigger agency. Then Pantone chip definitions and swatches. This is were Pantone was born and blew up. A color system which was consistent ...


7

The benefit of having your full name in a logo is that, well, your name is the logo. Nike has the benefit of spending hundreds of millions of dollars to train the public to know that a "swoosh" = Nike, but you don't have that luxury. Not yet, anyways! While using initials or symbols in logos can sometimes lead to more creative solutions or more distinctive ...


7

That said is it bad to assume in re-branding that people would go to the site to fill out a contact form? Yes. I have found it a mistake to assume the preferred method of communication from any client. I have clients that I've never personally spoken to and everything is handled via email. I have clients who will send an email then call to see if I ...


7

Obviously the sharper the transition the better - but sometimes compromises are needed. I was working at an organisation that had this exact issue. They were large, very budget-conscious organisation with lots of very varied branded products with very varied stock turnaround, and a new brand that was maybe 40% similar to the old brand. They did it in a ...


6

Welcome to GD.SE, and thank you for a great question. It's one that challenges designers often enough that I'm guessing there will be plenty of answers. Based on what you say, I think the key is, "I'm confused because they are." The way to reduce any confusion, in design or anywhere else, is to pick ONE item out of the morass and start with that. It almost ...


6

My feeling is that if the company name is genuinely the same as the parent name with "Co" rather than "LLC," you should do a variation on the LLC branding. Not an exact pickup, but let's say if the LLC's corporate colors are burgundy and black and the typeface is Bodoni, the Co's logo should use a gray and a pale red (not a pink, but a tint of the burgundy) ...


6

Using a stock image as the entire logo, or even part of a logo requires proper permissions. The permissions depend on the license that that image is licensed under. Which license is needed is wholly dependent on what you plan to do with the final product. There are websites that have one license applied to the entire website, and anyone uploading to that ...


6

The challenge with greyscale on screen is a lack of richness. That is, if you stick with strict greys. There are of course variations of grey that are in fact chromatic neutrals. IOW, they are not completely devoid of saturation. Albert Munsell, had some great theories about the use of color that may be helpful to you. In particular, his thoughts on color ...


6

Branding collateral could also be written (with the same meaning) - Collateral to branding. This is everything that supports the brand. Things like stationery, web-banners, posters, flyers etc. Collateral is officially defined as: Situated or running side by side; parallel So, to this, you can assume that branding collateral is something that runs ...


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


6

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


6

In all your samples (except perhaps the last one) they simply are a reference to web design/development. The use is similar to a wrench used in a logo for a mechanic or plumber - it's just what the trade uses so it's included as part of the logo. Note the word "code" in 99% of your samples, this is what the various brackets refer to. < > = html ...


6

As a general rule, if an identity program has a specified typeface, you should stick to it in all media. A particular campaign may have its own identity with its own fonts, different from the brand's usual typeface. The reason for this isn't that style guides are binding or executives are stubborn, although both of those can be true, it's that repetition ...


5

What you're referring to aren't really grids; they're construction guides. The grid is just what's formed by the horizontal and vertical components. And while some of these construction guides look really fancy and complex, they probably weren't as hard to create as you imagine. Usually, the designer starts with a general idea of what they want to build and ...


5

Kind of a broad question but in case the powers that be decide to keep it ... "Vintage" means nothing more than denoting an identifiable period of time. Whatever you can do to invoke your chosen time period is fair game. It's a gestalt impression, not one particular piece of the puzzle. Analyze the techniques, motifs, palettes, typography, and subjects ...



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