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32

It seems you and your client use different definitions of the word "original". You seem to mean it in the sense that you created the emoticons from scratch without copying anyone else. Your client seem to mean it in the sense that they look too much like other emoticons already out there. Compare this to much of pop-music. Most songs are original in the ...


19

I want to portray myself as a fresh, young but old-school designer that has an appreciation for crisp, clean design, though isn't afraid to go wild. Just my opinion.... take it with a grain of salt. Nothing about picking a font and adjusting the letter spacing reads "isn't afraid to go wild" or even "crisp and clean". To me (someone with a designer's eye)...


16

Something like this should get you started. The key is to imply motion by making the text appear to be trying to go somewhere. and because we read from left to right, make go from left to right. Otherwise it will appear to be moving "backwards". Note: the graphic is awful looking, but it is there to demonstrate a concept.


15

There are several ways you can represent "fast" in a logo. One way is to "italicize" the logo (text and/or graphics) which conveys movement. The more you angle the content, the more speed is implied. However, too much angling could distort your work. Adding lines behind the movement might help. See GiantCowFilms example for this. You might also consider ...


12

If you know of the opponent-process theory, you will know that there are 6 'special' colours: Black, white, red, green, yellow and blue. Although the receptor cones in the eye are sensitive to Red, Green, and Blue, prior to processing the brain encodes the information using 3 channels: Black:White Red:Green Yellow:Blue These 6 colours are thus termed ...


12

I've found when I don't have a clear winner its because of a few reasons: I didn't set up inspiration boards. Contrary to what most people say its GOOD to have reference, not always but most of the time. Being inspired and stealing are completely different things. I didn't set up clearly defined needs for design. Who is the audience? What are some designs ...


12

There may not be a good reason to redesign a logo if it is easily recognized and if the market generally has a positive opinion of the brand. In fact a better option would be to make subtle updates that keep logo pretty much the same but perhaps improve how it can be applied in different use cases. So make sure you have a good, solid business case before ...


11

To maintain brand identity a logo should generally have a set color scheme. Generally... Full color Two Color (if appropriate) One Color Reversed If you vary beyond this and start swapping colors for every projects you greatly degrade any brand identity unless the color variations are for a very specific reason. Think of any major brand... does their ...


11

Logos would be done with paste-up: text might be created using a linotype or phototypesetting machine. I personally used a machine that had fonts on wheels approx 12" in diameter which you rotated and selected individual characters using a footswitch. This exposed the type on a strip of photopaper and at the end, you'd had a line of text which you would ...


11

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


11

Limit their options. Lots of people like to think they are knowledgable in design, or typography, because 'anyone can judge whether something looks good or not, right?'—while they aren't. Don't let them do your work for you. My advice would be to do your research and deliver three options (possibly four), and present those to them, nothing more. Do ...


11

What you'd like to do falls under "don't". From page 68 of the Facebook Product Assets and Identity Guide: DON'T Modify the “f” logo in any way, such as changing design or color. If you are unable to use the correct color due to technical limitations, you may revert to black and white. Cutting the 'f' away from the backdrop is ...


11

I think this is primarily an opinion-based question. Here's mine. Should I use my own name or have a business name for my services? Yes. In other words, it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things. It may matter to you personally, but not really in any legal or strategic way. Using your personal name may make it a tad harder to form a ...


10

I'd start by looking into the business decisions for having both MyCompanyLLC and MyCompanyCo. It seems to be more of an accounting/legal distinction rather than any purposeful branding/marketing decision. At that point, you need to decide if the objective should be to better distinguish between the two companies, or if in the eyes of the customer (be it ...


10

Removing is modifying Of course you'd be modifying the logo: you're taking away a fundamental piece of the design. Facebook would be overjoyed if the internet promoted their brand exactly as they've spec'd it. They paid a lot of money for that style guide! But social media is an unruly space With the internet as your defense attorney, you can establish ...


10

While I generally side with you that original work implies that you performed the work from scratch, I must ask a few questions: Did the client approach you about this or did you pitch it to the client? If you are the one that pitched the idea then the client trusted you to truly wow them since they are likely paying a premium for these original ...


9

It's a policy issue, not a technology one. You should have a brand identity style guide document of some sorts that shows the appropriate use of the visual elements and what to do and not to do with them. Templates can be provided as a courtesy--but it has to be a policy: "All distributed materials must adhere to the Style Guide. All marketing materials ...


9

To me, a logo is a simple graphic 'device' which identifies a brand. A brand will only have a single logo (possibly with a small number of variants for different media or 'sub brands'). A brand to me is a much broader thing, encompassing the feel of a company from a customer's perspective. For example, a company like IBM has a brand which is very 'serious'. ...


9

I would first ask myself, why is the client picking typefaces at all? Are there brand standards in place I have not been made aware of? For the record, there's nothing which states two or three or fifteen typefaces are too many for a logo. If designed well the quantity of typeface variation is irrelevant. If you can pull off a great logotype with six fonts ...


9

FedEx uses the arrow in their design: As other people point out italics often represent speed as well. Here's an image I found googleing for things that might help. This combines an arrow moving right (The direction that it is being read) with speed lines on the left (again, the direction it is being read.) In addition, the word "express" is in ...


9

how do you present multiple examples to the team I agree with Vincent, but will be a bit more emphastic: You don't Your job is to present the best option and then back up that decision as you see fit. Avoid too many options if you can. One, maybe two is ideal.


8

First of all, was the logo designed "for the website," or is this the company logo? If it's the company logo, those are the corporate colors, and I don't think you should start adding other colors because you think the existing ones are "boring." In certain industries, "boring is beautiful," and adding "flash" makes the client look bad. That's the opposite ...


8

As a general guideline, you can't reason someone out of a decision they didn't reason their way into. If Comic Sans gives him the fuzzy-wuzzies because it looks cozy and friendly, you have to point out the emotional impact it has on his clients/vendors. (That is, it makes him look like he's running his shop out of his basement.) As far as tactics go, try ...


8

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


8

Similar to Ryan's answer but more a choice from your own branding guidelines. You can use Ryan's suggestion, or you can use the one that's even better from your guidelines. The one on the bottom left: I think it's beautifully branded by the way. Something like this - you can pull the template straight out of the PDF you linked to:


7

I agree 100% with DA01's comment. Without some sort of mandate coming from above, any technical attempt can be undermined at-will. However, Word does have a "Protect Document" feature. In Office 2003, it only allowed editing of comments. As of Office 2007, you can create forms and allow just the forms to be edited. It appears to provide fairly decent ...


7

My feeling is that if the company name is genuinely the same as the parent name with "Co" rather than "LLC," you should do a variation on the LLC branding. Not an exact pickup, but let's say if the LLC's corporate colors are burgundy and black and the typeface is Bodoni, the Co's logo should use a gray and a pale red (not a pink, but a tint of the burgundy) ...


7

Welcome to GD.SE, and thank you for a great question. It's one that challenges designers often enough that I'm guessing there will be plenty of answers. Based on what you say, I think the key is, "I'm confused because they are." The way to reduce any confusion, in design or anywhere else, is to pick ONE item out of the morass and start with that. It almost ...


7

The problem you actually have isn't the one you think you have, but it's one that every designer faces often: the clients actually have no idea what they're looking for, so they have given you a list of vague concepts instead of a clear design brief. Your job at this point is not to start trying to design something. It is to work with the client as long as ...


7

The challenge with greyscale on screen is a lack of richness. That is, if you stick with strict greys. There are of course variations of grey that are in fact chromatic neutrals. IOW, they are not completely devoid of saturation. Albert Munsell, had some great theories about the use of color that may be helpful to you. In particular, his thoughts on color ...



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