New answers tagged

4

As others have said, it's poor practice as a designer and I would personally be very unhappy. And there may very well be legal issues. The use of shutterstock images for a logo has been discussed here. The image on shutterstock says: Copyright: majivecka This is from the shutterstock license: YOU MAY NOT: i. Use Visual Content other than as ...


0

I think this is probably a matter of opinion. I know that I would be disappointed if I paid someone to design a logo and they used a stock vector. At the least, the designer should have told the client that they had found a stock vector they would like to use. The fact that it's a royalty-free image means there is no legal concern, but it also means that ...


1

TL;DR it seems they are inexperienced or unprofessional. I'd personally not feel comfortable and would cut my loss and find a more experienced designer. Stock photos and vectors are there to make people's lives a bit easier / jobs cheaper and quicker. Pretty much most designers use stock images or vectors regularly, this week for instance I've used some ...


2

I like Pooka Studio better. It provides context, signifying that this is a creative studio. It’s descriptive. Are you referring to Celtic Mythology? If so, consider the alternate spelling “Púca” because it lends an air of sophistication. To me at least, “Pooka” looks a little child-like. Nothing wrong with that at all. But “Púca” seems the opposite: ...


-1

Poo sounds kind of like, you know, poo.


2

If it wasn't mentioned in a contract that everything in the files belong to the person you did them for and if the project was cancelled, these files are yours. What's not yours are the logos used, pictures, and specific elements of the branding you used for the layout. If the program was cancelled and the files were not paid for, you can do what you want ...


2

Assuming the logo itself is not up for discussion, I will say yes, you can use the r on its own. I think example #3 is the best one. 1 gets a little convoluted. 2 is rather boring and generic. I would also like to point out that 2 and 3 have "Lift" higher up and that works well. Lift - float - ascend etc., it emphasises the balloons (presumably) ...


1

I think there are tasteful ways to do so, especially if the "R" is the first letter of the company name. But even if it's not, I can imagine scenarios where using it as a secondary design element would work. You could even use the outline of the "R" as negative space, something like this:



Top 50 recent answers are included