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0

you can go check out openclipart.org Everything on the site is free for commercial use and of high quality as well.


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There's a lot of confusion here, revolving around the use of "original". The issue at hand, I believe, is that the customer wants to be sure they have the rights to use the designs without anyone claiming they're a copy of their work, and hence there is copyright (or possibly trademark) infringement. The fact that you designed the logos from scratch does ...


1

This is a necessary part of any contract, and you need to have a contract. The contract should say that you have all the rights to any images or other copyrighted work that you supply, and similarly that the client will obtain any necessary rights to any material they supply. The contract also must specify any licensing or transfer of rights, and probably ...


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While I generally side with you that original work implies that you performed the work from scratch, I must ask a few questions: Did the client approach you about this or did you pitch it to the client? If you are the one that pitched the idea then the client trusted you to truly wow them since they are likely paying a premium for these original ...


31

It seems you and your client use different definitions of the word "original". You seem to mean it in the sense that you created the emoticons from scratch without copying anyone else. Your client seem to mean it in the sense that they look too much like other emoticons already out there. Compare this to much of pop-music. Most songs are original in the ...


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Show them your process of creating the emoticons! The sketches you have made, the progress, etc.


4

A few points to make: Any values you have are an approximation, there are RGB colors that cannot be represented in CMYK, likewise there are PANTONE colors that cannot be reproduced exactly in RGB or CMYK. Colors will always look different across different devices, different screens, different printed materials etc. There is no way around that. The way ...


4

Do a mock up... Construct the box! The size is quite small so you are fine. There are some copy stores where you can print a Tabloid size paper. Try to use the thickest paper possible. You can also print on adhesive paper and paste into a thicker paper, but the print could crack on the folds. A comment. I am scared by the idea that designers do not use ...


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The reason you want to give for graying out the logos is that they need to be downplayed in relation to your own branding and style. They are shown probably as examples of partners or some such thing, they are secondary to your product/company logo and should visually reflect that. You don't have to follow other companies brand guidelines in work that is not ...


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Follow the brand guidelines. They are there for a reason. I know it sucks but that's how it is. If you spent hours of your life creating detailed brand guidelines just for people to ignore it, you wouldn't be happy (I'm not anyway). If there aren't any brand guidelines (you should actually request these, not just search the company's website) then by all ...


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Yes, you can use atleast 2 different font family to any corporate designs. I myself working as UX Designer, here they have a brand guidelines and have two font families, Helvetica Neue and Arial. While creating some thing for emailer we user Helvetica for image texts and headings and for main content we use Arial.


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Most corporate style guides, if well considered, will employ two or more typefaces. If a skilled designer has been responsible for the production of the brand and accompanying style guide, the fonts should be, at the very least, complementary to one another. If well considered, there shouldn't be any conflict between the different typefaces. It may be that ...



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