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5

It is customarily not appropriate to ask for royalties on logo usage. Traditionally all rights are transferred to the client in logotype projects and the designer retains nothing. I've never, ever, ever heard of any designer trying to limit the usage of a logo designed for a client. That's simply not done in my experience. It's their logo and they need to ...


0

Forgive this answer as it doesn't directly address the question, but if you are truly this lost and this rebranding is important I would probably consider bringing in a local designer to at least consult with before you make any decisions. A few billable hours and they could at least give you some feedback and steer you in a good direction. No offense or ...


1

what better way than to show in the browser? after all, that's where their going to be viewed. i'm a firm believer in building the browser, and this is just another tenet of it. at the most basic level, you can simply take a page of content you have now and swap the fonts out. this will vary on the font(s) and your methods, but not by much and nothing too ...


5

The different parts of a corporate identity program can't designed in isolation. They are like the variables, object classes and functions you build into a piece of code, or the parts of an engine: they have to work together as a whole. For that reason, context is everything. A color can appear quite different in different surroundings, as many famous ...


2

Unless you are making a statement by the typeface you choose, you can do far worse then using Times New Roman for body with Helvetica for headlines. No one will think they are a great choose, but they are everywhere and will not give your company a bad image. So if the brand does not have a set of values that calls for a distinct choose of typeface, maybe ...


9

how do you present multiple examples to the team I agree with Vincent, but will be a bit more emphastic: You don't Your job is to present the best option and then back up that decision as you see fit. Avoid too many options if you can. One, maybe two is ideal.


10

Limit their options. Lots of people like to think they are knowledgable in design, or typography, because 'anyone can judge whether something looks good or not, right?'—while they aren't. Don't let them do your work for you. My advice would be to do your research and deliver three options (possibly four), and present those to them, nothing more. Do ...


4

I would start by saying keep an open mind. People don't tend to like change even if they have asked for it. I usually present typography in the way it's going to be used, for example if your company has a heavy typographic leaflet, create a new one and explain the benefits of such typeface. Don't just put the alphabet together and say here we go guys. Show ...



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