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1

First of all: I like it. Hexagons are the most space-economical shapes there is, there is no other shape that would let you pack more stuff in a small space. Consider bee-hives. I think this is a good thing. I prefer the colour combination of lime-ish and teal-ish, but consider how this will be used. In fact; I do like the idea of having a logo with ...


0

My opinion is that graphic design represents communication, so you should make a numbered list of priorities of what you want a design to communicate. ("Geometric consultant speaker" isn't enough of a spec). If you test it on a target audience and they get the message as you intended it, you succeeded. If they don't get the message, you failed. Without ...


0

Until you add some info on what in particular you are unsure about, I have some suggestions based on your image: Color While I like the colors you chose for your final version, I see a small issue with the blue and pink when they are touching each other. Something about the contrast is not working. This doesn't happen in your dark and yellow logo, blue ...


0

Although I understand everyone's thoughts of going with the second version, I would not. Engravers Gothic is too widely used in luxury brand identities (Marc Jacobs, Acqua de Parma – to name a few)…thereby making it less unique. If you would like your brand to stand out among the rest, I would go with number 1.


0

Alan perfectly explained the norm for well executed branding. Consistency is king when is comes to hammering a brand into the public's mind. Beyond simple reinforcement by repetition, a consistent face/voice/experience gives the impression of stability and trustworthiness. But there's a loophole You can also be consistent with variety. For instance, if ...


1

There is a better way The old approach to branded web type: A. Render type in images to avoid font availability issues. B. Use a system font that's close but waaaay more clunky. Don't do that. Use web fonts. There are plenty of quality sources. On a budget but still need high quality? Go to Google Fonts. You can even download them for print. Font ...


5

As a general rule, if an identity program has a specified typeface, you should stick to it in all media. A particular campaign may have its own identity with its own fonts, different from the brand's usual typeface. The reason for this isn't that style guides are binding or executives are stubborn, although both of those can be true, it's that repetition ...


2

You'll find that it's typically up to the company whose brand you are representing. Some have strict style manuals that must be strictly adhered to, some don't have any kind of identity guidelines, and some have one that the old marketing director commissioned but the new one doesn't really use all that much. You'd be best off asking the client how much it ...


2

My experience is primarily in c++, and a mix of misc. high level languages. I don't do much work with .html or web work. From my experience the first two are the most semantically consistent: [] An array, generally a collection of items or data structure. This is probably why it was selected by code academy. It implies a collection of type code, ...


3

They mean whatever you want them to mean. They're just a decorative element. As you state, most of them refer to 'code' of some sort and have been used for the past couple of decades in tech company logos. In fact, they've been used so much for tech company logos that it might be almost cliche now to use it, so you may want to consider going a different ...


5

In all your samples (except perhaps the last one) they simply are a reference to web design/development. The use is similar to a wrench used in a logo for a mechanic or plumber - it's just what the trade uses so it's included as part of the logo. Note the word "code" in 99% of your samples, this is what the various brackets refer to. < > = html ...


1

Personally, I think it is hugely dependent on your audience. Children for example love characters, cartoons, animations, smiles and general rainbows, sunshine and happiness. (or at least that's what we condition them to like/like to think they like). So responsive characters and smiley faces are rampant in logos aimed at children. E.g CBeebies this is ...


0

I don't have any studies, but years ago I came across a website called Suicide Food. I don't advocate the viewpoint, but I think it is relevant to your question. Once you see what they are talking about it is hard not to see it in logos etc. everywhere. My personal reaction is humor and laughter, but I suspect the people who run/ran that blog are earnest ...


1

I don't think you can assert a matter of perception as a "law" which applies to everyone. I personally like shapes and symbols better than personifying everything - it gets a little cheesy after awhile. I think it is all about preference and execution. If you have a crappy mascot, it won't fly. If you have a crappy geometric logo, it won't fly either; but ...


5

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


0

I like the first one, it has more of a classic feel and the "PARIS" just looks like luxury. The second ones horizontal scale seems too wide, especially in the A and S.


2

I would say the first font is better for a fashion brand because it is thinner and more angular. These things give it a great feminine distinction and make it more appealing to that audience. It also has the advantage of being bolder and will stand out better when inverted to white against color and will stand off print material well when black.


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.



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