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To answer the question in practical terms (from my experience of working for a brand design agency): designer researches the company and competitors comes up with ideas/concepts and brand values creates a logo based on brand values and research mocks logo applications (mock up of the logo in various contexts like a website, a shop, a letterhead) ...


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To put it very concisely, you need to evaluate what end game you envision with your change. In other words, what are you trying to achieve by changing the logo? My recommendation from my days as a consultant is to give your client a range of options to choose from, all of which achieve more or less the same goal. You know what you want to achieve and by ...


2

In general, an Identity kit (or Brand Guidelines) isn't so much about including specific images. There will be some imagery but it's more about usage. You detail items such as: Logo versions: All variations of approved usage from 1 color to full color and reversed including required space around the logo, what not to do with the logo, etc. Approved ...


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In the best possible suggestion I can give, I'd supply a 'Branding Guidelines', the different versions of the logo, materials for the business, and mock ups to illustrate what everything would look like.


4

The massive 150-page Design Guidelines I worked on used a variant of option 2. There was a section in the Guidelines about PowerPoint, which stated that branded, designed templates existed (with company logo, colors, and layout) and were to be used, but within those templates, standard system fonts (Arial and Times, probably) were used in place of the ...


6

Ideally all collateral material is designed, formatted, and created by those that know design and would therefore have the brand fonts installed. Just because a piece is not "exciting" or visually important, such as a contract, it doesn't mean a designer should avoid it. A well designed, branded contract carries a solid message with it. Forms which ...


11

There may not be a good reason to redesign a logo if it is easily recognized and if the market generally has a positive opinion of the brand. In fact a better option would be to make subtle updates that keep logo pretty much the same but perhaps improve how it can be applied in different use cases. So make sure you have a good, solid business case before ...


1

Absolutely! Whether or not it should is a different topic, but just look at the battle between 'flat' design and the skeuomorphic designs of the early 00s. http://www.flatvsrealism.com/ We're actually living in a fascinating time for this topic, as the 'flat' design trend is becoming so overwhelming that we're seeing brands that haven't updated their style ...


2

Most all identities evolve over time. There should be some shared DNA, but trends and styles come and go and brand identities tend to follow along.


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A brand is not just the logo and the usage of visual elements. It is instead a promise of what users and buyers will get by using said branded company/organization. It's the entire experience, from the moment a user discovers the brand down to how complaints and feedback are handled. Brand is the ultimate user experience - it is the sum total of the company ...


2

It's context-centric, for the most part. It really depends on the particular business and the needs of the client. Let's take a restaurant. They need an identity. That could be: a new logo and be all that the job entails. Ideally, though, you'd get to talk with them some more and explain to them how a cohesive brand identity is important as it's not ...


1

Probably a good start is a good interview with the client. You can not (or should not) start designing a logo if you do not have a minimum information. For example, a logo for a electronic medum only, lets say a web site, can use gradients and shadows, but if the logo must be printed in a shirt, or must be phisically built in the exterior of an office ...


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I've done it both ways. Sometimes a client of mine will already have a relationship with a printer and want to handle the printing themselves. In this case I make sure the the print ready files are done to the best of my abilities (I usually try to find out what printer they are using to best finalize my files for that printer) and either send the print ...


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That is a decision between the designer and the client to make. There's no "right way" to handle this although many designers prefer to do the hand-off as they're more likely to have the vocabulary and domain knowledge to communicate clearly with the printer about what is needed.


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For a free, modern alternative to Helvetica Neue (mentioned by Scott), with some oblique cuts (like Novecento Wide), see Liberation Sans / Arimo.


1

Collateral design and branding design are two different things. Collateral design usually refers to a form of promotional design that supports marketing or maybe the introduction of a brand. Collateral design can be focused on print, but a great deal of it use to border on package design. A good example would be if a sports cable tv network wanted to pitch ...



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