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It won't matter, while some people enjoy having a name that represents a company or business, it won't affect anything, yes, your domain name would be affected, and it would be better if it were simple so people could find your website, but we're talking about your BUSINESS name. What is your website? Did you think about using that name, because if employees ...


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I think it is very important to use your own name. It is not egoistic at all, it is your name and you are using it as an artist ( graphic artist ). Stefan Sagmeister, Karlsson & Wilker, Massimo Vignelli, all use their names. Vignelli expanded into Vignelli Associates. You can always use DBA in case of expansion, at which point you can use another name. ...


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Depends how you want to market yourself. Some designers refer to themselves as "we" or "us" and pretend they're a big business, whereas some freelancers like to be honest and upfront, and keep it personal. I'd market yourself as yourself, get your name out there and maybe think about making a brand long-term.


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It matters less than the product. If what you're selling is fantastic, then you could call your company "RayWenderlich.com" and people would would still hold you in high regard. If you're not going to use your name, I recommend following the guidelines in the book, "Made to Stick", in which it has as much of the following as you can cram into it: ...


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If you listen to the godfather of corporate logo design, Paul Rand (and really, you should) you show one idea: The arguments for this approach is that the client has hired you based on your existing work. As such, they want your skill set and experience and they should trust your skill set and experience. You, as a trusted, experienced designer should ...


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I responded to a similar question at Freelance.SE. I've actually run all 3 types over the years..... a business name, as myself, and as a business name which included my own name. The gist.... Using a business name: People tend to treat you as an "intern" or some random employee. I often find conversations, at least at the beginning, are very abrupt and ...


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I think it's better to show 3 different concepts but that also depend on your contract and how much time you want to spend on this. With design, I like to say "everything is possible it's just more expensive." So it depends on the budget of the logo, how fast you create and in how much time it needs to be done. If you work as an in-house designer for a ...


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The only permissible use of someone else's copyrighted material I'm aware of is for fan fiction or tribute sort of use. But certainly not for profit.


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This question has TOP priority also in my mind and I made research for this a lot. Some other benefits: Using a Business name: It gives the opportunity to sell the business later if needed (of course if you know for 100% that you will not sell, then forget about this); Better because if your business doesn't go as you planned, for example, you get some ...


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I feel it is a very simple choice. Based on your intentions or the intentions of your business. Do you want to freelance and make a name for yourself? -> Pick your name. Do you want to hire people as soon as possible? -> Pick a company name. My opinion: don't be that one-man-company writing emails referring to yourself as "we". It's insincere. If you ...


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I think this is primarily an opinion-based question. Here's mine. Should I use my own name or have a business name for my services? Yes. In other words, it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things. It may matter to you personally, but not really in any legal or strategic way. Using your personal name may make it a tad harder to form a ...


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I think its mostly a trend thing. It boils down to a few things: Do you see yourself as an artist? If you do then it is quote natural build a name for yourself, like most artists through the ages have done. There is also a natural tendency to want to do this early in your career/school as you need to eventually sell yourself. Once your brand starts to grow ...


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There's no standard, but the important consideration is to make sure you're not using a value of an entity that actually exists. There's an entire Wikipedia article on placeholder names. It covers all kinds of things, including company/organizations and physical addresses. Name "John Smith" or "John Doe" are the first two that come to mind. You could also ...


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I have never heard of any standard placeholder text but you can use something like this Name: John Smith Owner (I wouldn't use the words job/position, that is implied) Email: name@yourcompany.com name@example.com website: yourcompany.com example.com It was brought to my attention that yourcompany.com is a registered domain name which should not be used ...



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