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31

I assume you are asking how much you should charge to design a business card. The answer to that is: your hourly rate * the number of hours it takes you to complete the job The key is to figure out your hourly rate. That is: annual revenue $ / # BILLABLE hours you work per year Your annual revenue is all the money you need to bring in to cover all ...


31

This is a bit of an opinion-based question, but I still think there's value in it. Also somewhat belongs on Freelance.SE, but may fit here as well. To be honest, the most difficult part of freelancing is sticking to your guns during negotiations. This is compounded if you financially need the work. The best option is often to simply stick to your price ...


31

I've never run into this exact problem but if a client sends me a logo from another company I email them back asking if they have written permission to use said logo in their marketing. If they say yes then that is sufficient for me. To word it nicely I go with something along the lines of: I see you'd like Acme Co.'s logo included in your artwork, do ...


28

The big issue I see overall is a struggle to make contrast work but a hesitancy to actually push the contrast to a readable state. All the semi-transparent rectangles behind information make for a very unclear business card. Be very careful when you find yourself wanting to put outer glows and drop shadows on text. This is sure sign that there's a ...


25

In my contracts I have clauses to the effect of "Client promises that all artwork provided for Designer is owned by Client, or Client has permission from the owner to use it. If Client is sued for copyright violation, Client will state that it was not Designer's fault." Whether it's effective, well, I'm not a lawyer, but this at least specifies that you're ...


24

Depends on your contract. In general, absolutely, yes. You did the work, you provided it to the client, now their job is to pay you. I would not offer a discount (seriously, 50 variations?) but would keep it in mind for negotiation if needed. Given that you did so many variations, I would probably offer a 20% discount at most, but only if they were ...


20

That sounds like Spec-Work. http://www.no-spec.com/faq/ You should show them what you are capable of (i.e. your portfolio) but be wary about doing any work for them for free.


17

If you lower your prices, don't forget to lower your service. As @Scott says, rates are set for a reason. If a client asks us for a cheaper deal, we say "yes" and then we re-propose the project with some features or aspects removed. We then make the client aware that we've achieved a cheaper price by reducing features or proposing a slightly ...


16

Stefan has several excellent points, which I'll echo and expand upon: Write up a contract. You don't start anything without a contract. It took me over a week to write my first contract, but that baby is as detailed and iron-clad as I could make it, and now I can slice-and-dice and adapt it to future jobs. The AIGA has a ridiculously detailed sample ...


14

You should have a portfolio - pieces that show examples of the type of work you are able to do, the styles you work in, etc. If they're asking for a "free sample" of the page make sure you have a legal document in place to protect your work (and copyright your work before you sent them the "free sample"). There are plenty of legit people that can't imagine ...


12

The Cons: you're working for pennies you're working for a 'client' who has committed next-to-nothing to the project you're not designing based on any real client or business objectives/requirements there is no proper feedback loop you're competing with people that are likely using unlicensed software and type you're wasting your time The Pros: ...


11

Yes, this is a typical issue. At its core, it's a client thinking that their solution should be designed around their personal tastes rather than around particular business requirements that will meet the needs of their customers. The key is to talk in business terms, not in subjective art terms. Be prepared. Study your customer's business, their industry, ...


11

Don't resent your client for wanting more, but educate them. The original editable files are your blueprint by which you create their design, but the design is what they buy, not the blueprint. Try a comparison, like: If you get a tailor made suit, you don't ask the tailor for the pattern and a pair of scissors afterwards, just in case you'd want to make ...


11

You say "no, sorry, I can not violate [insert your country here] Copyright Law. I'd be glad to help you license artwork legally." You should also have a clause in your contracts along the lines of "all artwork provided by the client shall be artwork the client has full rights to reproduce. Designer will not be responsible for any artwork that was provided ...


10

Well, your contract should have stated that you are only creating a design (or print job, website, whatever) for the client, and that you explicitly are not surrendering source files. If it didn't... Then you tell the client that while it's physically possible to give them a clean PSD (IL, INDD, etc.) eventually, right now the file is a mess. Or it's ...


10

Well, it is hard to say specifically, because such conditions need to be negotiated before the work, not after project dismissed or finished. But, for sure, you can protect all intellectual property you did and client can't use any of your ideas or sketches without payment. So, you can try to negotiate sell of your concepts, otherwise notify to complete ...


9

It's probably time to hang up a shingle and promote yourself as a freelancer, at least for the time being. Acquent is one good place to start. Make yourself a fantastic-looking business card, carry everywhere and give out freely. Although you can always poke around for pro bono work for local charitable or religious organizations, these aren't the best for ...


9

I think most clients will assume price is negotiable and try to lower it ;) Something you can do is offer more than one option per project. This doesn't work in every case, but I've done it a few times and results were good. You make two or three proposals based on features, starting with the most basic one and going up to a super-complete-pack. You list ...


8

I would highly recommend taking a look at the AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services. It is a very extensive agreement that somewhat favors the designer, so if you want to know how to cover your butt, this is probably the definitive document to read. I have read it many times over, and I don't see very much in there that is superfluous to even ...


8

Any contract should clearly state what the client is purchasing rights to, what those rights are, and what the designer is retaining. I never sell rights to sketches, preliminaries, notes, etc. They are always retained and the client is purchasing the final image/design/product only. I will sell the rights to the final product if it's negotiated - this ...


8

This time: Pekka's answer is good. Next time: Pay attention to how many hours you're putting in. As you approach the estimate mark, you send a note to the client, saying "Hey, I quoted you for 36 hours, which was to cover services X, Y, Z, A, and B. We're only done X and part of Y, and I'm up to 30 hours already. I'm happy to continue working with you ...


8

I wouldn't necessarily be insulted. Your client is simply coming to the table with some terms. You can accept them, deny them, or counter. I'd recommend countering with a formal contract. Typically designers do not deliver the work files for a number of reasons (the least of which is that the client usually has no use for them). But it's not unusual either. ...


8

Is one to do with visuals and the other with content? An article published "Creative Director vs. Art Director": Creative Director's Key Role The creative director typically thinks through the early phase of the project to develop the concept. This director oversees the entire team, which includes the copy chief, photographer and art director. ...


8

Charge a higher hourly rate to compensate. If you work 25% faster than what most designers do, then charge 25% more. Working fast with quick turnaround at a premium quality is something you can use to justify the higher hourly rates.


7

"What does typography means" Typography refers to type. The art and craft of setting and using type. It can also refer to lettering design, and the design of type (the letterforms) itself. It's a little odd (but not unheard of) that they are asking for a 'developer' with 'typography skills'. Based on that, I'd say they are looking for a talented graphic ...


7

Welcome to the World of Graphic Design... lol.. you see their mind is growing with ideas because now it's trial and error to them. You give them a time limit. You know the job takes you 10 hours to do. You tell them how long it takes without revisions, offer 2 revisions then tell them to pay per revision there after. You shouldn't have to explain why, just ...


7

Where a logo is concerned, or similar identity material, the client would have to be very naive, or very foolish, and the designer unethical, not to ensure that all rights in the finished design are transferred to the client upon acceptance of the finished work. As the designer, you never lose the right to display in your portfolio (including your website) a ...


7

Or should I re-quote them and if so, how should I go about doing that? If it's squarely their fault, I would absolutely re-quote them. Everything else would create a bad precedent for how additional time is dealt with in the jobs to come. The more detailed documentation you can provide along with the re-quote, the better. A work log like this (pulling ...


7

I've helped a few organizations - some were ongoing, others were one off tasks. Most of the organizations were from Idealist.org The issue was complete lack of organization: One organization posted looking for someone to design and send out their newsletter. They tell me they're interested and would be in touch. Next thing I know they're telling me I'm ...


7

It's like swimming... you have to just jump in the water and learn as you go. You will get taken advantage of. You will get clients that fail to pay you. You will come across clients that argue about pricing, some to great degrees. You will get projects that grow well beyond what was explained to you. You will have clients that want to design for you and ...



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